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But actually obtaining one is extremely difficult, most of not all mavericks you find will be either orders arriving for someone or have an insane dealer markup. I've seen 10k on a used one. Ranger can be had for cheaper.
Just need to look and be willing to travel. Found a dealer 4 hours away from me that had a few and wasn't adding ADM.

Also, you can order the AWD ones, they closed ordering for the hybrids.
 

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Every single vehicle you listed are unibody, though. The comment I was replying to recommended “something with a full frame…” and you just proved my point - it’s difficult to get something with a full frame and one that’s decently equipped for under $40k.

The Jeep Cherokee is a Subaru Forester-sized vehicle. I don’t care what the rating says, I absolutely would not tow 5,000 lbs with that car. Not to mention, you couldn’t pay me enough money to make me want to drive a Chrysler/Stellantis product. Same way with Nissan.

As for the Highlander? Great vehicle if really boring. But also, the AWD version of the Highlander is the only one that can tow the full 5,000 lbs, and in the current market, Toyota dealers around me are selling FWD Highlanders for well north of $40k. They’ll laugh me out of the room if I expect to get an AWD Highlander for under $40k.

Hence, I personally landed on the Outback.
You're correct, I misread what you said. However, these models are a reinforced unibody, which when combined with a factory towing package allows those to tow more than other vehicles not similarly equipped.

Keep in mind that those tow ratings are actually a formal standard established by the Society of Automotive Engineers that was designed to ensure that the ratings are uniform industry-wide. See this Motor Trend article for more information: SAE J2807 Tow Tests - The Standard

If you want a body-on-frame vehicle like a Nissan Armada or Toyota 4Runner under $40K, consider looking at manufacturer Certified Used program vehicles that are a couple of years old. They have been thoroughly inspected and given an extended warranty. That's how I bought my current ride, a Toyota Avalon Hybrid. I don't regret going that route at all; I got more vehicle for much less money than new that way.
 

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Just need to look and be willing to travel. Found a dealer 4 hours away from me that had a few and wasn't adding ADM.

Also, you can order the AWD ones, they closed ordering for the hybrids.
What area are you in? I looked hard for months and I found some dealers who weren't marking up, but no inventory available. Those that had them were marking up huge. I searched lots of areas...
 

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The Foz Wilderness and the Outback Wilderness have the same tow ratings.

3500 lbs and 350 tongue. This is almost double what you're looking to tow.

Either vehicle would be acceptable.

The Outback will require premium fuel when towing however I do not believe the Forester does.

The Forester will excel with gas mileage versus that of the Outback.

If you were looking for something larger to tow I would consider a large vehicle but a vehicle towing less than 2000 lbs it's not worth considering something larger.

I say this as a person that has a vehicle with a Class 5 12000 lb hitch and has personally towed 4000 lbs with a 2017 Subaru.
Hello sir

I have the Wilderness and wanted it for towing a trailer but then decided to have a tow vehicle as well. So story short the OB is not allowed to be towed and so went out and bought a a Cherokee 2022 Jeep Trailhawk 4X4 with hitch. It is a tow and can tow up to 3500#. They where both at the same price range of about 40k. But now having the jeep I would consider selling the OB.


Regards.

Jeep owner. And Wilderness OB
 

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Hello, we just cancelled our order for a '22 FW after getting nervous that it would not have enough hp/torque for a 1900 pound camper that we intend to buy. Back to figuring out a tow vehicle. We are now looking at the Outback Wilderness, or the new '23 Outback Onyx turbo. Both seem to meet the needs of towing the Alto r1723 camper. For all those that tow campers with their Outback, which would you endorse as a tow vehicle? Or do you wish you had a different tow vehicle? If so, why? We are total newbies with towing. If we move forward with the Outback as our tow vehicle, what should we be considering/any advise when building the order?
We’re towing an Aliner expedition with our Outback Wilderness. We’re very happy with it’s performance. We driven all around the Colorado and Wyoming mountains in the last months and the OBW tows the trailer without effort. Our Aliner is about 2000 lbs when loaded.
Wheel Tire Cloud Car Vehicle
 

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What area are you in? I looked hard for months and I found some dealers who weren't marking up, but no inventory available. Those that had them were marking up huge. I searched lots of areas...
I'm in DC metro area, I'll try and find the dealer again, granted it was a week so so ago, sure they sold as hot as the Maverick is.
I deleted the book marks because I decided I was settling and I'll just continue to wait on my 2 door Bronco.
 

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Hello, we just cancelled our order for a '22 FW after getting nervous that it would not have enough hp/torque for a 1900 pound camper that we intend to buy. Back to figuring out a tow vehicle. We are now looking at the Outback Wilderness, or the new '23 Outback Onyx turbo. Both seem to meet the needs of towing the Alto r1723 camper. For all those that tow campers with their Outback, which would you endorse as a tow vehicle? Or do you wish you had a different tow vehicle? If so, why? We are total newbies with towing. If we move forward with the Outback as our tow vehicle, what should we be considering/any advise when building the order?
Towing a 2.5k camper in 2021 xt for about 18k on regular gas never a problem even in Colorado. Xt is the ideal car for towing imo tells me water temperature, oil temperature, grade travelling. Add a hitch dampener like rockaball, wrap some duct tape around the hitch and it’s zero noise zero jerk cruising. You can’t find a quieter and more comfortable way to tow without getting a Range Rover. I had to get a xt over 2019 3.6r due to tongue weight
 

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I keep coming to the Outback (Turbo), OBXT, as well and it remains at top of my consideration to purchase vs other manufacturers. I intend to tow a 14-15 footer toy hauler (to haul my 450lb motorcycle) and very few RVs (campers) float to the top (i.e. dry weight of 1500 pounds, add 500 for moto, 500-750lbs for gear thus totaling around 2500-2750 pounds) which is still under the 3500 pounds limit for the OBXT. I also don't want to spend $50K on a vehicle and the OB seems versatile enough that I could choose to sleep in it (or take a tent) and/or tow the moto only.

True that the tongue weight is 350 pounds on the OBXT?
To the OP, did you end up going to the Ridgeline?
 

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If the Ridgeline is an option, but money is a concern, look at the Nissan Frontier. Cheaper, actual ladder (truck) construction, and will tow a lot more. Trans fluid changes are easier than oil changes. Not too fond of the new engine/trans layout, but if you can find a newer 4.0 with the "antiquated" 5 speed auto, I'd seriously consider that. Rock solid dependability. With that being said, the Frontier is the only Nissan I'd consider buying.
 

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I keep coming to the Outback (Turbo), OBXT, as well and it remains at top of my consideration to purchase vs other manufacturers. I intend to tow a 14-15 footer toy hauler (to haul my 450lb motorcycle) and very few RVs (campers) float to the top (i.e. dry weight of 1500 pounds, add 500 for moto, 500-750lbs for gear thus totaling around 2500-2750 pounds) which is still under the 3500 pounds limit for the OBXT. I also don't want to spend $50K on a vehicle and the OB seems versatile enough that I could choose to sleep in it (or take a tent) and/or tow the moto only.

True that the tongue weight is 350 pounds on the OBXT?
To the OP, did you end up going to the Ridgeline?
I know of at least a few people that tow an Intech Sol Dawn Rover with an Outback XT and that has a dry weight of 2,750 pounds. One even tows in the mountains of Upstate NY. There are quite a few others that tow this trailer and their tow vehicle has a capacity of 3,500 pounds and the trailer's GVWR is 3,500 pounds.

Yes, the tongue weight is 350 pounds.

Your mileage and comfort level may vary.
 

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2021 Subaru Outback Onyx XT
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Hello, we just cancelled our order for a '22 FW after getting nervous that it would not have enough hp/torque for a 1900 pound camper that we intend to buy. Back to figuring out a tow vehicle. We are now looking at the Outback Wilderness, or the new '23 Outback Onyx turbo. Both seem to meet the needs of towing the Alto r1723 camper. For all those that tow campers with their Outback, which would you endorse as a tow vehicle? Or do you wish you had a different tow vehicle? If so, why? We are total newbies with towing. If we move forward with the Outback as our tow vehicle, what should we be considering/any advise when building the order?
You should have no issues towing the Alto at 1900lbs. As an Onyx XT owner we tow a trailer that is about 1700 dry and when loaded is up to 2500lbs just fine. There are plenty of quality of life upgrades you can do though to make the ride more enjoyable though. Keep in mind that all of these choices are optional and are just ways to improve how the Outback tows trailers. A stock Onyx XT with the OEM hitch is perfectly capable of towing the Alto R1723 without any of these modifications.

1. Suspension Lift / Upgrade - Most expensive option, but the stock outback suspension is super soft. This makes for a smooth ride, but when towing a trailer heavier springs and better struts help you feel more in control of the trailer should it be windy, or you have to make a quick maneuver. The lift from the IronMan 4x4 Suspension Kit (in case of our trailer) just helped provide a better straight line across the vehicle and the trailer as the rear will sag (a lot on stock suspension, less on an upgraded suspension). I say this was a huge different as I couldn't imagine pulling our trailer across the US without it.

2.Steering Dampener Lockdown - This was to remove the dead zone in the steering caused by the rubber bushing for the power steering. In removing this play by inserting the lockdown, it made highway travel with a trailer much better as the car tends to wander a little from the pull on the trailer and that play in the steering was causing me to constantly correct it.

3. Bushing for your hitch point. This can be the cheapest and easiest quality of life upgrade. There are several products that accomplish this like the Curt Rockerball that simply provide a bushing + hitch ball to dampen the coupling point. This takes out a lot of the clanking sounds and as well as greatly reduce the jarring from start/stopping. Because they are bushings it will require some maintenance in terms of keeping the bushing greased, but it's minimal and really simple to do for how infrequent it needs doing. The Rockerball has an added bonus for us Outback owners of adding a little bit of additional hitch height.

4. OBD II Sensor - This is for those of us like to keep an eye on Transmission temperature as it can get quite high depending on your ambient temps, elevation and if you're towing through anything not flat terrain. Subaru doesn't expose this in their dashboards so an OBD II Sensor is required to get access to it.

5. Transmission Cooler - @Salukispeed did a nice mod recently by upgrading their transmission cooler and it seems to have negated almost all concerns of temperature.

Those are my modifications and I highly recommend any of these if you are able/willing to do them. They have provided an incredible level of comfort when towing compared to the first time we towed with the Outback. As being new to towing, there are tons of resources here and other places on how to tow and how to load your trailer. It seems like you're going down the right path by asking ahead of time so be sure to spend time reading/watching materials on how to tow and how to distribute load in your trailer.

Keep in mind that the Outback XT models are more than capable of towing, provided you work within it's limitations. If you plan on towing frequently and/or over long distances, make sure you keep up with your fluid changes, particularly your Transmission and Differentials on the severe schedule as they can and will break down more quickly as they will experience more extreme thermal cycling than not towing at all or infrequently over short distances.

Edit: Here's a pic of our Travel Lite Rove Lite 14-FL. Sticker says it's 1700LBs dry, but I recently had to weigh in for registration and it came out to 2000lbs, but this also included the battery, propane and the things we just keep in the trailer. In this pic, we had about 120lbs on the roof basket, trailer was close to 2500lbs, included a wife, 2 cats, a dog, 2 rabbits and everything we needed for our move across the country. We have pulled this through a variety of scenarios, including sand, dirt roads, fording about 8" of water that was overflowing a levy and some pretty awful weather and never felt like we were exceeding what the Onyx was capable of. The only exception to this was Tennessee and Colorado mountains where we did have to mind speed to keep oil / transmission temps in a more reasonable range. The upgrade @Salukispeed did is now on my list and it appears this would fix those edge cases for us, but in FL that was never necessary even in the dead of summer.
Tire Land vehicle Wheel Plant Sky
 

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If @traildogck still has them, I think the super soft trans mount insert may also help stabilize the additional strain on the transmission.
 
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If @traildogck still has them, I think the super soft trans mount insert may also help stabilize the additional strain on the transmission.

I forgot to mention, but I do have the medium insert from AFD. It seems that adding a lift adds to that strain on the drivetrain and the insert is to help deal with that. I took a gamble on going medium, instead of soft. It worked out quite well and didn't appear to increase the cabin noise but gave additional stiffness to that CVT Transmission Mount. Super easy install 10/10 would recommend for the time/cost is so minimal to get it installed.
 

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I haven't towed a camper yet but I have towed some heavy utility trailers (carrying stuff) that were almost double the 1,900 lbs you are looking to tow, and my car did fine. I imagine either the Wilderness or the Onyx XT would do the job just as well. You do get a higher final drive ratio with the Wilderness (4.44 vs. 4.11) when compared to all other Outback XT trims, so that helps the Wilderness trim have better low end torque and (I think) slightly better throttle response.

If you plan to tow extensively, I would highly recommend the OEM hitch instead of anything aftermarket. The OEM hitch does only come with a 4-pin connector, so you would have to get a 7-pin connector plus brake controller aftermarket, but the OEM hitch is significantly better designed, so worth the additional cost.

The only other thing to keep in mind is that when towing, you are required to use 91 octane (or more) minimum. It is worth mentioning, though, that if the Ascent is of any consideration to you, then you are free to use 87 octane all the time even when towing. But either of the Outback trims you are looking at will be plenty capable for a 1,900 lb trailer
Where would you get a 7-pin connector plus brake controller? I'm surprised the OEM doesn't include that.
 

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Where would you get a 7-pin connector plus brake controller? I'm surprised the OEM doesn't include that.
Majority of the unibody (maybe all?) car based platforms don't have a 7 pin connector.
 

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Majority of the unibody (maybe all?) car based platforms don't have a 7 pin connector.
That’s not exactly true. Subaru’s own Ascent comes with a 7-pin when equipped with the tow hitch. Of the others that I know of for sure, the Ford Explorer and Chevy Traverse also come with 7-pin connectors if equipped with the tow package. Most of the German/British brands also have the 7-pin with their unibody SUVs. Jeep equips both the Grand Cherokee (RWD-based) and Cherokee (FWD-based) with 7-pin connectors with the tow package.

Subaru really should at least offer a 7-pin connector with the Outback as a factory option, considering that the owner’s manual calls for trailer brakes for anything over 1,000lbs. It’s not always necessary because I myself have towed much more than that over short distances with only surge brakes in the trailer, but it would be nice to have a factory option for a 7-pin.
 

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@MusicCItySonya if your heart is set on a Subaru, your best choice will be the Ascent: comparable price to a turbo Outback, higher tow rating, bigger vehicle but not too big. If you're open to something other than Subaru, there are many choices out there as others have mentioned.

Good luck and let us know what you decide.
 

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she does not love. Lots of folks on the Altoiste fb group love the Toyato Hylander Hybrid and the Honda Ridgeline. The former is out of our price point. She drove the latter yesterday and fell in love. So I'm tagging along today for the test drive, and if I'm on board, we will move in that direction. It's several grand more than we want to spend, but it checks all the boxes for towing, and according to her, drives like a very comfortable but not too big SUV. Like someone said - not too much car, but also not too little. This has been a long couple of weeks trying to narrow this decision down, and both this and the Forester forum have been invaluable in our process. Thanks so much. I'm sad to not be a 2 Subaru household, but I am a loyalist and will always drive a Subaru . . . unless someone wants to give me a Tesla:)
Funny, I was VERY, VERY, VERY keen on getting a Ridgeline back in the spring, my wife and I test drove a 2022 model, nice features and such, especially the locking, waterproof under-bed trunk, however both agreed was WAY too big. Same weekend test drove the Mazda CX5 and with Subaru right next door wandered in and looked at the Wilderness. Lower cost cost than same model year Rigdeline. Parking the Ridgeline in downtown Vancouver, we'll.... no thanks.

Long story short we ended up with the 2022 OBW and while it's a large vehicle, other than the locking truck in the Ridgeline, don't regret that decision and it IS still smaller, especially width than the Ridgeline.
 
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