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Ordered a 2023 Limited XT, Cosmic Blue, waiting for it to arrive.
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I have been considering a Honda Passport, testdrove it yesterday. Nice vehicle and I am going back and forth between the OBXT and Passport. Outback is cheaper (Limited is about the same price as an EX-L which is a lower trim) but I am debating between the towing capabilities. 5000 lbs on Passport opens up more possibilities but will I ever get a trailer that large and if I do it could be a few years out at which point I can decide if OB is doing it for me or not. Decisions, decisions...
 

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You should have no issues towing the Alto at 1900lbs. As an Onyx XT owner we tow a trailer that is about 1700 dry and when loaded is up to 2500lbs just fine. There are plenty of quality of life upgrades you can do though to make the ride more enjoyable though. Keep in mind that all of these choices are optional and are just ways to improve how the Outback tows trailers. A stock Onyx XT with the OEM hitch is perfectly capable of towing the Alto R1723 without any of these modifications.
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Edit: Here's a pic of our Travel Lite Rove Lite 14-FL. Sticker says it's 1700LBs dry, but I recently had to weigh in for registration and it came out to 2000lbs, but this also included the battery, propane and the things we just keep in the trailer. In this pic, we had about 120lbs on the roof basket, trailer was close to 2500lbs, included a wife, 2 cats, a dog, 2 rabbits and everything we needed for our move across the country. We have pulled this through a variety of scenarios, including sand, dirt roads, fording about 8" of water that was overflowing a levy and some pretty awful weather and never felt like we were exceeding what the Onyx was capable of. The only exception to this was Tennessee and Colorado mountains where we did have to mind speed to keep oil / transmission temps in a more reasonable range. The upgrade @Salukispeed did is now on my list and it appears this would fix those edge cases for us, but in FL that was never necessary even in the dead of summer.
Hi @newsubiewhodis, can you provide an estimate on material costs/install and/or time invested to install for these mods? Thank you.
 

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2022 Outback Limited
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We have 52 years experience with towing boats, dune buggies, jet skis behind motorhomes, truck campers and even
a 2013 4wd V6 Tacoma carrying a 1200 pound camper while flat towing a 1987 Suzucki Samurai in desert and the mountains with no towed vehicle braking. for 8.5 years. Towing mileage with camper loaded full time and towing the 2400 pound Samurai 16 mpg on premium fuel (91 octane) 60 mph (California).

Max towed weight '22 Outback. 2700 pounds less 10% for safety = 2,430 pounds max weight to be safe. You don't say how many people your carrying. If two, food, water, clothes chairs, etc. will add at least 400 pounds, maybe 500 to the 1900 pound weight of your trailer. Plus cross winds and semi trailers will have you praying to the guy sky that you don't get killed on the highway.

The Subaru is not designed to tow this size trailer. too heavy.

We ordered it with the Trailer Towing package. to transport the pedal assist electric to the beach and occassional utility trailer and maybe...BIG maybe an Aliner pop up trailer. It's unloaded weight is 1500 pounds. so 2000 loaded Probably we won't do it, we will buy another second generation Tacoma, use it as a daily driver and to tow the trailer

I would suggest a 4 door pre-runner Tacoma. Buy a pre-2015 because in 2015 Toyota changed the motor size from 4.0 to 3.5. It will tow 6500 pounds and average 22mpg solo so you can drive as a daily driver. Toyota motors will go 3-400,000 miles, so even a 10 year old one will give you many years of service.
 

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2021 Subaru Outback Onyx XT
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We have 52 years experience with towing boats, dune buggies, jet skis behind motorhomes, truck campers and even
a 2013 4wd V6 Tacoma carrying a 1200 pound camper while flat towing a 1987 Suzucki Samurai in desert and the mountains with no towed vehicle braking. for 8.5 years. Towing mileage with camper loaded full time and towing the 2400 pound Samurai 16 mpg on premium fuel (91 octane) 60 mph (California).

Max towed weight '22 Outback. 2700 pounds less 10% for safety = 2,430 pounds max weight to be safe. You don't say how many people your carrying. If two, food, water, clothes chairs, etc. will add at least 400 pounds, maybe 500 to the 1900 pound weight of your trailer. Plus cross winds and semi trailers will have you praying to the guy sky that you don't get killed on the highway.

The Subaru is not designed to tow this size trailer. too heavy.

We ordered it with the Trailer Towing package. to transport the pedal assist electric to the beach and occassional utility trailer and maybe...BIG maybe an Aliner pop up trailer. It's unloaded weight is 1500 pounds. so 2000 loaded Probably we won't do it, we will buy another second generation Tacoma, use it as a daily driver and to tow the trailer

I would suggest a 4 door pre-runner Tacoma. Buy a pre-2015 because in 2015 Toyota changed the motor size from 4.0 to 3.5. It will tow 6500 pounds and average 22mpg solo so you can drive as a daily driver. Toyota motors will go 3-400,000 miles, so even a 10 year old one will give you many years of service.
The XT Trims and the Wilderness Outbacks are capable of towing up to 3500lbs with a 350lb hitch. It is more than capable of towing a 1900lb trailer. I say this only towing for 2 years and have enjoyed every minute of the learning experience and could only imagine the things you have learned and experienced in that time. The Outback is my first "tow vehicle" but has been a great fit for our Travel Lite Rove Lite 14FL which when loaded up sits north of 2000lbs.
 

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2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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We want something with more hp/torque than the standard engine. You have highlighted something else to weigh in our decision making process. Not the news I wanted, but I'd rather figure that out now than later. In the end, when we weigh all the pros and cons of any tow vehicle we are considering, the cost for high octane gas/gas mileage might cancel out with another vehicle that gets lower gas mileage on the daily.
towing is hard on vehicles. (need to swap transmission fluid, brakes, etc more often)

just a little note on gas mileage vs. gas price, the engine works "hard" to overcome the weight and the wind resistance of the trailer that is taller than the tow vehicle.

in the past few weeks:

my nephew just towed a new 24 foot trailer across the country, with a 2016 Jeep Grand Cherokee 6 cylinder gas engine...getting about 13mpg.
(he was making stops to visit friends/ family, he bought it on the east coast as his price was cheaper than buying in California where he was going to keep it )

and if anyone cares about heavier:
my brother on the other hand was just moving his 1998 ford motorhome, a 30 footer, on a Econoline 350, with a 6.8 V10 gas engine in it. getting about 7 mpg,
he was stuck" where there is high gas prices california highways ...$1 per mile if he "had" to buy some. he has owned this one since about 2003.

both intend to live in them for a time being between houses.

maybe we need a report your towing gas mileage thread.

year, trim, engine, and trailer weight / type, and where you were towing. (like ...sea level at 80F, or greater Denver at 94F)
edit: and not by that dashboard crap gauge that tells me 99.9mpg and then 10mpg in the same 10 seconds.
 
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2022 Outback Limited
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The XT Trims and the Wilderness Outbacks are capable of towing up to 3500lbs with a 350lb hitch. It is more than capable of towing a 1900lb trailer. I say this only towing for 2 years and have enjoyed every minute of the learning experience and could only imagine the things you have learned and experienced in that time. The Outback is my first "tow vehicle" but has been a great fit for our Travel Lite Rove Lite 14FL which when loaded up sits north of 2000lbs.
Remember that was just my 2 cents based on many years and lots of hauling experiences around the USA. Whatever you choose just be careful. At age 78 I'm too old to have the freeway adventures that you may have towing a large trailer with a car. One trick towing a trailer is to crack open back window on driver's side and front window on passengers side. When the semis pass they are pushing a big wave of air that under certain circumstances can push you right off the road. opening those two windows will allow some of that air to equalize the pressure as it moves through the trailer.

Tow Hitch. If you can special order the Wilderness, then the hitch will be installed at the factory saving the extra labor costs when the dealer has to remove big parts to get to the frame. If you choose UHaul make sure they don't drill into the "frame rails" as that will nullify your warranty. Good luck and be careful.
 

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2022 Outback Limited 2.5
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A quick report on some towing experience with my 2022 2.5 Limited.

We rented a Braxton Creek Bushwhacker this past week. GVWR of 2000 lbs, and it probably weighed close to that with a full water and propane tank.

We towed it up from Franklin, NC to the Mount Pisgah Campground on the BRP in the 2.5 Outback. The rental place was at about 2000 feet elevation, and the campground is at almost 5000 feet (in a 60-mile drive). It managed, but it wasn't an amazing experience. Throughout the trip, all of the uphill chugs were limited to about 45-55 mph to keep the oil temperature from climbing indefinitely. I didn't get any hotter that 260 F. No OBD sensor, so no idea of the transmission temperatures. No warning lights, though. We are talking about several miles of 8-10% grades, so pretty heavy stuff for the East coast.

Coming back down the mountain (with electric brakes on the trailer) was better. Engine braking kept everything in check, and I only needed brakes in the corners.

Moral of the story is that the 2.5 Outback is capable of towing 2000 lbs., but it's not comfidence-inspiring on long uphill climbs. I assume the XT would have performed better.
 

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Based on what I have read, watched and been told, ratings are just that, ratings. Size of the trailer, axle weight limits (car and trailer), gross weights, tongue weights, your tires and how old they are, weather and wind conditions, terrain, etc. means you should probably not tow more than 2000 pounds (comfortably) and no more than 2500 pounds (queasily) on an OBXT even though it's rated for 3500 pounds / 350 tongue weight. Some trailers have 15% of gross weight on the tongue and yes you can use distribution techniques but for liability reasons alone, do consider not carrying "at max" loads. This brings me to my next point.

As I indicated in an earlier post, I am also considering a Honda Passport which maxes out at 5,000 pounds. Applying a similar formula, I probably would not tow more than 3500 pounds with that vehicle either, but it does open up a lot more possibilities of the type of trailers I can tow with this (a decent sized bathroom, bigger bed, stand in it, etc.). The question is, would I, should I? The bigger they get, the more they are to maintain, harder they are to park and get into places, etc. etc. I do like the OBXT and the way it drives (like a car) vs PP (does have a nice V6 though) and it's great that the OBXT has such a high tow capacity of a vehicle its size. Couple more testdrives this week (without towing) and I would like to settle on one or the other.

Of course, this is all my personal opinion and there will always be someone that says, it's too much or it's too little but based on my research, I think I am close to getting this one right.

Question - I saw a Youtube video of a reviewer in Australia towing 2000KG (that's 4400 pounds) which apparently is the max limit in the Australian OB (vs US which is 2000 pounds and not KG for the 2.5L non turbo engine). Note, he did specify 2000KG and 4400lbs so it's not a typo. His was a 2.5L aspirated engine. The engine was at 5500 RPMs (working hard) but maintained 100KPH (~60mph) uphill, flat, etc. on cruise control. Again, not saying I would do this but they seem to have the same chassis, same engine, why is their tow rating different? Happy to provide a link.
 

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Remember that was just my 2 cents based on many years and lots of hauling experiences around the USA. Whatever you choose just be careful. At age 78 I'm too old to have the freeway adventures that you may have towing a large trailer with a car. One trick towing a trailer is to crack open back window on driver's side and front window on passengers side. When the semis pass they are pushing a big wave of air that under certain circumstances can push you right off the road. opening those two windows will allow some of that air to equalize the pressure as it moves through the trailer.

Tow Hitch. If you can special order the Wilderness, then the hitch will be installed at the factory saving the extra labor costs when the dealer has to remove big parts to get to the frame. If you choose UHaul make sure they don't drill into the "frame rails" as that will nullify your warranty. Good luck and be careful.
JP and Home 4: JP experience not too bad, however if you do that again weigh the trailer when you pick it up empty. compare that weight to what dealer says its unladen weight is.

Then fill it for your trip and weigh it again, you will be surprised at the weight difference from what the rental company says it weighs, A good example: In 2012 when I took delivery of our new 4 wheel camper shell the empty sticker weight 525 pounds. Ours had addition accessories. inside cabinets, house battery, misc items and and awning. actual weight 850 pounds. Added a few more items and finished weight now 1100 pounds. truck weight without tailgate 4,000 pounds.

4,000 plus 1,100- plus me 220 = 5,320 pounds. Gross vehicle weight stock tires 5,500 pounds. I added new rear springs to support 1,800 pounds and load range E tires rated at 6,000 pounds each. My all up weight with full fuel tanks, food, water, solar, chairs , etc and one person for a week at the Death valley hot springs was 6,200 pounds - 700 pounds over gross for our 2013 4WD Tacoma. Ran that rig in the desert offroad for 9 years with no mechanical problems because it was set up for what I used it for.

I agree with Home 4. Subaru isn't the vehicle to pull a trailer and carry the family that is that reason they don't offer a 7 pin electrical connection. That vehicle is not designed to pull anything more than a tent trailer.

If you don't want a Tacoma size truck with a cap on it, check out the Honda Pilot. If its rated for 5,000 pounds loaded you can easily SAFELY tow that trailer that JP mentioned.
 

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Hang on now, lol, you're putting words in my mouth. I never said that Subaru is not meant to pull a trailer and carry a family. I said that I would not pull more than 2500 pounds or exceed the tongue weight (say 250 to 300 pounds max) or axle rating of the vehicle or trailer or pull on crappy tires. I am confident Subaru can pull a trailer within the limits I specified based on research I have done. Time will tell and I may change my opinion once I get this vehicle and start towing with it, so stay tuned (at least till next year it ain't happening AND I have to buy this vehicle first :).
 

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Hang on now, lol, you're putting words in my mouth. I never said that Subaru is not meant to pull a trailer and carry a family. I said that I would not pull more than 2500 pounds or exceed the tongue weight (say 250 to 300 pounds max) or axle rating of the vehicle or trailer or pull on crappy tires. I am confident Subaru can pull a trailer within the limits I specified based on research I have done. Time will tell and I may change my opinion once I get this vehicle and start towing with it, so stay tuned (at least till next year it ain't happening AND I have to buy this vehicle first :).
I know you didn't say that. "I SAID THAT". I have been driving midsize pickups for over 30 years. Pulling trailers and carrying campers pulling boats from San Diego to Needles on the Colorado river. Dealing with semi's and the wave of air they push rolling up and down mountains. Midsize trucks are the safest under those conditions. At our age we are probably done camping. Even so every once in awhile I get the itch. Will probably rent a small motorhome to scratch it after my hip totally heals (8 months to go). Good luck Home on whatever you decide. Then update the rest of us on your experiences.
 
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