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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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Discussion Starter #1
Gentlemen,

Picked up the new ride today, and want to kill the TPMS light on the dash (presently running winter tires without the TPMS units).

Where is the TPMS Receiver unit located so I can disconnect its harness and kill the dash warning light?

Many Thanks!
 

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2010 Outback Premium 6MT
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17 Posts
I realize this response is 18 months late, but I believe the receiver is under the driver's seat.
 

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Black electrical tape over the dash. The receiver doesn't light the dash the cars ECU probably does. Yes late reply but odd that no one responded.
 

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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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722 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Gentlemen,

Came across the FSM and have located the TPMS receiver behind the side interior panel of the cargo area on the driver's side of the wagon.
 

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There might be a TPMS control module or circuit in addition to the receiver. With the receiver disconnected, the main TPMS module might well continue to flash the light because of the disconnect, just as it does now because there's no signals from the wheel sensors. (Flashing light means a technical problem; steady light is when the system is working properly, but a sensor is sending a pressure signal that is lower than the minimum threshold.)

But I guess it would still be worth a try . . .
 

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2017 OutBack Premier, 2019 Forester Ltd, 2016 370z Rdstr
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Discussion Starter #6
Plain OM,

Thanks for the followup! Most appreciated.

At this point I've lived with the annoyance for over a year and a half, and have decided to just live with it. I'm a wrencher and could easily pull everything apart, but from what I've researched thus far it may be a waste of time.

My wife's Lexus is exactly the same way, with the original wheels and tires for the summer, the TPMS works just fine. But I have a hard time justifying the $300 a car it'll take to buy more tire sensors for the winter wheels and do the programming.

I'll just live with the yellow dash light on in the winter, and continue to do frequent tire pressure checks every other week (yup, I actually do do it every two weeks. What's an old retired guy going to do with his time otherwise?).
 
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