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2007 Outback 2.5I non Turbo
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Discussion Starter #1
I searched and nothing came up. Does anyone have this pdf? I plan to replace my front and rear struts next weekend and would like to have a printed copy in hand when I take it in for the alignment.
 

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See attached:

Most computerized alignment machines, if kept up-to-date, should have the revised spec. Might be good to check at the time. The technician can do the initial measurements (the "before" readings) and print this out for you. It will show the current settings and the specs. Also, ask for the same report after adjustments are done (usually the before and after are in the same report).
 

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Car: 2008 Tribeca, 2010 LGT, Sold: 2005 XT Limited
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My local shop had the old specs this spring, FYI, so do bring the revised specs.

Tire Source in Boulder, CO, a much beloved tire alignment place here in a town that also has 2 subarus for every 1 person...
 

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2007 Outback 2.5I non Turbo
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59 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Cool thanks guys, 30psi seems a bit low to me but I guess I'll start running my tires at that.
 

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Car: 2008 Tribeca, 2010 LGT, Sold: 2005 XT Limited
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I really don't know what does in to the PSI number. Seems like a lot of people these days run near max sidewall pressure for best fuel economy. Not sure how that effects handling.
 

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Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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^ max pressure on the sidewall is not a good pressure to use. When they make the tire they don't know what vehicle it's going on. They just need to tell you what not to go over. To see what you should use, look on the placard inside the drivers door jam. I like to add maybe 2 -3 psi-g to that when the tires are cold. Too much pressure can negatively effect the handling and unevenly wear the tires (center will wear out before the sides)


Tire Tech Information - Air Pressure - Correct, Underinflated and Overinflated


Disadvantages of Overinflation

An overinflated tire is stiff and unyielding and the size of its footprint in contact with the road is reduced. If a vehicle's tires are overinflated by 6 psi, they could be damaged more easily when running over potholes or debris in the road. Higher inflated tires cannot isolate road irregularities well, causing them to ride harsher. However, higher inflation pressures usually provide an improvement in steering response and cornering stability up to a point. This is why participants who use street tires in autocrosses, track events and road races run higher than normal inflation pressures. The pressure must be checked with a quality air gauge as the inflation pressure cannot be accurately estimated through visual inspection.
 

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2008 Outback 2.5i
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If you look at the TSB, it specifies vehicle load of 220lbs excluding occupant weight. The occupant is typically only the driver, so if you have a second person in the car + some extra stuff, then you are the specified weight.

I do like that the TSB specifies that when towing a trailer or vehicle load of 441lbs (excluding occupant weight) to have the rear tires inflated to 37.5 to 39 psi.
 

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2006 Outback 2.5i Limited 5MT, 1984 Porsche 944
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I thought that was interesting, since the manual states the max tongue weight of a trailer shouldn't exceed 200lbs. (Obviously there are other dynamic forces going on with a trailer, but 241lbs of static load worth?)
 
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