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Tried to test drive an 2020 XT version Sat, but dealership did not have one. Instead test drove a Limited 4 cylinder 2.5 model. But I wanted to test drive a Touring with ventilated leather seats. Sale person said if I was not going to tow anything, the 4 cylinder would be plenty of power and save on gas. Even when I test drove a Mazda CX5, the sales guy said the 4 cylinder would be plenty and save me money too vs their turbo. The Mazda turbo was a bit noisy too, but had good pick up.

So question to all of you Subaru folks, would the 4 cylinder 2.5 182 HP Outback Touring be plenty of power for everyday use (I don't travel to the mountains that often. I live in middle NC - some hills and flat land). I will test drive a Touring XT at another dealership to see how it drives and noise vs the 4 cylinder model. Thanks for any feedback.
 

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My first response is that the salesperson, being a salesperson, wanted to sell what was in stock (or has decided what they are most likely to be able to sell to you) and therefore pushed the 2.5.

You can't tell if that's what you really like until you try the turbo. The stronger engine should transform the drive of the car, and that might be what you are looking for, but you'll have to try it.

Salespeople will throw in the supposed greater fuel economy of the 2.5 as a selling point, to clinch the deal, but please tell me what the big difference is in fuel consumption is between the two engines, since I don't see it. The 2.5 used 10-12% less gas last time I checked.
 

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Depends on how/where you drive! Quite frankly in many situations, and nearly all urban or suburban driving, you'll never have a chance to get into the boost at legal speeds. It's getting to speed quickly on an on-ramp, or passing maneuvers where the higher output really shines. (You don't need 260 hp to get up to 25, 35, or even 40 mph).

I drive my wife's '18 Crosstrek frequently on weekends, and other than a full load of 4 passengers on a higher speed road, or quickly passing other traffic, that little 2L does just fine. You also accelerate faster from a stop or low speed if you gradually push the pedal down, as opposed to mashing the go-pedal. I have to restrain myself in that respect, as my 3.6R with 5EAT takes off like a rocket with a quick jab of the go-pedal.....doing that with the Crosstrek yields slower acceleration than a nice smooth progressive push. (Probably the tuning of the CVT's torque management, and the converter being unlocked until around 15 mph or so).

I'll try both, as I did back in '14 when I bought my 3.6R. It just happened to have hit the lot as a CPO the morning I was there. The first drive in a 2.5 actually wasn't bad, and felt better than the numbers would indicate, and I have a heavy right foot accelerating. (Don't driver super fast, but like to quickly get to speed with traffic).
 

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It’s true the plain old 2.5 gets terrific fuel economy when mated to the CVT.
We have the 2019.
The 2020 gets additional variable intake timing to compliment the already fantastic exhaust VVT.
Also it’s direct injection. It will have a better power-band and be more efficient.
 

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Discuss the reliability of the turbo unit over the life of the car. I have never owned one with a turbo, and never wanted one so I can't offer any real world experience on this subject, but would love to hear from some owners that have had one for many years and lots of miles. I tend to keep cars 200K+ miles so I am used to things eventually wearing out like trans and alternators and AC compressors. I have heard that turbos are very expensive to replace, so that is why I choose not to add another item to the list of potential repairs. Also, I do not tow things or live in the mountains, am a conservative driver that puts about 12K miles per year on my car. I traded my '02 Chrysler with 187K miles (on it's 3rd trans...) for an '18 OB 2.5L and it is everything that I wanted and needed.
 

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OK, while they are not exactly the same in application, almost every diesel engine on the road uses a turbo. Now stop and start again at the beginning of the sentence before you jump on me about this, they ARE NOT EXACTLY THE SAME. But they are very similar. And if anybody knows anything about diesel engines, it is that they make a lot of torque, and they run forever. They run forever, with turbos. Yes it is something else that can go wrong, but the turbos on the new XT engines are a lot more like the turbo diesels and less like the 1980's turbos in Dodge Daytona Chargers and other such cars, which were definitely not known for running forever. In my mind, it is a safe bet that the turbo will be less likely to be a headache on these motors than folks who fail to properly maintain their cars.
 

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About 200 bucks a year extra cost....My 2018 Legacy with a 2.5 is just fine, but I do get a thrill from more pep so will definitely get the Turbo. Planning on spending more time in the mountains as well.
 

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It’s true the plain old 2.5 gets terrific fuel economy when mated to the CVT.
We have the 2019.
The 2020 gets additional variable intake timing to compliment the already fantastic exhaust VVT.
Also it’s direct injection. It will have a better power-band and be more efficient.
Plus you get a 600 mile range with the 2.5.....that's a biggie for me!
 

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I didnt even know about the 600 mile range of the 2.5. that's impressive. I get between 3-400 w my 2013.
I will paste what I said in another thread.

The 2.5 will be fine. The Turbo will be more fun, that's all. Some people here make it sound like the 2.5 barely works and is dangerous to drive if using highways. lol :rolleyes:
Ive driven 2 4 cyl outbacks into the ground - and modest toyotas before that, I drive more than most people and freeways are a daily part of life and mountain driving is certainly a feature in my travels. Im also told Im quite the aggressive driver - as in LA, you dont get anywhere if you arent. The "slower" outback has never been a problem, I get around quite fine on freeways and mountain roads.

I AM getting the XT this year because 1. I decided I have the money to spend for a "more fun" car. 2. The reviews for the 3.6 before always previously said bad mileage/too expensive for too little benefit for the 6 cyl OB - this year I think that has all finally improved a bit for the faster trim. and 3. My wife would appreciate it as she likes faster cars.

But honestly - that 600 mile range is great - and frankly - that 2.5 will be FINE. Mine have done well with everything Ive thrown at them and I am not a light or timid driver.
 

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2020 Outback touring XT - white. Previous 2015 Mazda CX-5
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Yes, up to 600 miles on a tank for the 2.5. (18.6 gal tank x 33 mpg = 613 miles).
On the other hand, (18.6 gal tank x 30 mpg = 558 miles). I voted for the XT, and I'll just stop for gas an hour sooner!
 

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Although we were originally going to get the 2.5, we ended up ordering the turbo XT because the engine sounded quieter, particularly during acceleration, and there was considerably less noise at highway speeds due to the sound insulating glass in the driver and front passenger door windows found in the turbo only. And, of course, the brisker acceleration of the turbo is nice. Figured the fuel cost will be about $250 per year more with the turbo, which was acceptable to us.
 

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Although we were originally going to get the 2.5, we ended up ordering the turbo XT because the engine sounded quieter, particularly during acceleration, and there was considerably less noise at highway speeds due to the sound insulating glass in the driver and front passenger door windows found in the turbo only. And, of course, the brisker acceleration of the turbo is nice. Figured the fuel cost will be about $250 per year more with the turbo, which was acceptable to us.
Does the Touring 2.5 not also have the sound insulating glass?
 

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So question to all of you Subaru folks, would the 4 cylinder 2.5 182 HP Outback Touring be plenty of power for everyday use (I don't travel to the mountains that often. I live in middle NC - some hills and flat land).
Millions of vehicles have been sold with the same hp to weight ratio, torque and 0-60 and 1/4 mile times for decades. In those terms the question almost doesn’t make sense as an actual question. Have you driven a car before, or driven in the US? How were past vehicles, what worked and what didn’t? What are you concerned about?

The highest quantity mass produced vehicles generally satisfy average daily driver needs for hundreds of millions of people in their respective markets.

Or maybe youre looking for socializing? Enjoy the chat here and keep pushing for some extensive test drives.

If you’re worried about performance take some friends along for some extra weight and the commensurate margin of error.
 
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