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Discussion Starter #1
First timer, and an old-timer at that, so go easy on me...
Love reading all your informative posts, both supportive and critical of OB’s.
Bought my latest OB, 2017 2.5 std specs, 24000kms only on clock, 2weeks ago and love it. Prev had 2009 and 2013 2.5’sa long term OB fan.
Not mechanically minded at all, and found the battery the other day, only kidding, but just thought I’d share a small item re tyre pressure.

The seller of my 2017 OB couldn’t get a Safety Certificate because the tyres were badly worn on outside, and after only 24k’s. Turns out he had been running on approx 26 psi for 3 yrs as he had not checked manuf. recommendation. So tyres were running on part outside walls as well, hence the wear. He should have got 35 to 40000 kms of course with correct tyre pressure. So I think 34 to 35 psi is the way to go for me for fuel economy as well as tyre wear. What’s the consensus out there? know I should be talking kPa these days, but it’s hard to update when one is in their 8th decade....
 

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2012 OB , 2017 Impreza
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3,206 Posts
I am not sure any single person can tell you what the "consensus" would be.

The FACTS are:
*) Too LOW pressure wears tires on outside edges
*) Too HIGH pressure wears tires down the middle

There is a pretty wide range of pressure in between those two extremes. Selecting the best pressure includes considering:
*) Safety
*) Handling
*) Ride quality

In the end, you do not have to ask on the internet what pressure to run... ALL automobiles have the recommend pressure on a sticker inside the drivers door.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am not sure any single person can tell you what the "consensus" would be.

The FACTS are:
*) Too LOW pressure wears tires on outside edges
*) Too HIGH pressure wears tires down the middle

There is a pretty wide range of pressure in between those two extremes. Selecting the best pressure includes considering:
*) Safety
*) Handling
*) Ride quality

In the end, you do not have to ask on the internet what pressure to run... ALL automobiles have the recommend pressure on a sticker inside the drivers door.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for your response Brucep, but I’m not sure why you thought you had to pick my post to pieces, particularly being my first. Are you a member of the “Grammar Police 👮‍♀️”on this site?
Asking for consensus was a general invite for responses, and the point of my post was to share the previous owner’s experience with low tyre pressure. I am aware of the manufacturer’s recs, but don’t always find them to be appropriate.
Your second and third paras are also obvious to all, but thanks again anyway for taking the time.
 

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2017 3.6 Touring
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31 Posts
I check and adjust tire pressures every fill up of gas.
Beware of dealership as the will say they adjusted to 36 pounds but after a recent service mine measured 42


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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2017 3.6R Limited
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I check and adjust tire pressures every fill up of gas.
Beware of dealership as the will say they adjusted to 36 pounds but after a recent service mine measured 42


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Healthy tires can lose 1 psi per month so when you factor in approximately 6-month service intervals and the assumption that most drivers won't check their tire pressure you get overinflated tires from the dealer. I bought my OB used 6 weeks ago and the tires from the dealer were at 43 psi.
 

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20 Outback Premium
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742 Posts
First timer, and an old-timer at that, so go easy on me...
Love reading all your informative posts, both supportive and critical of OB’s.
Bought my latest OB, 2017 2.5 std specs, 24000kms only on clock, 2weeks ago and love it. Prev had 2009 and 2013 2.5’sa long term OB fan.
Not mechanically minded at all, and found the battery the other day, only kidding, but just thought I’d share a small item re tyre pressure.

The seller of my 2017 OB couldn’t get a Safety Certificate because the tyres were badly worn on outside, and after only 24k’s. Turns out he had been running on approx 26 psi for 3 yrs as he had not checked manuf. recommendation. So tyres were running on part outside walls as well, hence the wear. He should have got 35 to 40000 kms of course with correct tyre pressure. So I think 34 to 35 psi is the way to go for me for fuel economy as well as tyre wear. What’s the consensus out there? know I should be talking kPa these days, but it’s hard to update when one is in their 8th decade....
I try to go with what's on the door sticker plus maybe 1 or 2 pounds more. I believe yours is 35F, 33R? And does yours have direct tire pressure readout on the dash? If it does, you will know your air pressure is correct if it increases about 10% from cold to hot. So if the previous owner ran 26, his hot pressure would go up more than 3 pounds because they were underinflated. If you try 40 psi, they will go up less than 4 pounds because they are overinflated. So if you're in the range of 35/33 or whatever your door sticker says, you'll probably go up 3-4 pounds from cold to hot which is just right. Using this same technique on our 19 and 20 Outbacks, our pressure rises 3-4 pounds starting from 36/34; our door stickers for both say 35/33. Probably a longer answer than you were looking for. Short answer: start with what's on the door jam and make minor adjustments from there. Good luck.
 

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Ok I will give you my opinion and I may not be an old-timer but I'm at least a mid-timer so there's that.

Set your tire pressure before you've driven it, to about 35 in the front and 33 in the rear.

If you drove several miles to the gas station, the tire pressure should be closer to 38 in the front and 36 in the rear, since tire pressures go up when you drive the car for a few miles.

If you have a couple hundred pounds of weight in the back of your Outback all the time, or you're towing, then increase the rear to be the same as the front, like 35/35 cold or 38/38 hot

If it's the dead of freezing cold in the winter and you're in a heated garage and take the tire pressure, then you need to increase the tire pressure by a few psi because tire pressure will drop when you drive out of the warm garage into snow.
 

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2020 Outback Onyx XT
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19 Posts
Healthy tires can lose 1 psi per month so when you factor in approximately 6-month service intervals and the assumption that most drivers won't check their tire pressure you get overinflated tires from the dealer. I bought my OB used 6 weeks ago and the tires from the dealer were at 43 psi.
Cars are shipped from factory with high tire pressure to minimize tire flat spotting while in transit. Apparently dealers are not resetting the tire pressure to mfg specs before delivery to customer. I experienced the same when taking delivery of my Outback the end of April 2020.
 

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...
If it's the dead of freezing cold in the winter and you're in a heated garage and take the tire pressure, then you need to increase the tire pressure by a few psi because tire pressure will drop when you drive out of the warm garage into snow.
It's a pretty simple calculation using ideal-gas law, but a real quick rule of thumb is 1 psi of pressure for every 10 degrees F. (or 1/8 bar per 10 degrees C)
It works in reverse too, during hot weather if your garage is cool because its attached to an air-conditioned house.
 

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I suggest you read the drivers side door panel and inflate to the recommended pressure, my 2010 outback is 31 psi front 30 psi rear. Incorrect tire pressure and uneven tire wear can cause problems with the AWD system. Always run matched set tires from the same manufacturer with the recommended inflation pressure, get a good digital tire pressure gauge and check them frequently.
 
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