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Discussion Starter #1
I've driven in front of U-Hauls about 4-5 times, but this is the most recent. Hopefully this recap helps someone else who's considering it.

I drove approx 650 miles from Fort Collins, CO to the outskirts of KC. Made the drive across 2 days since I couldn't pick up the trailer until 9am and didn't get on the road until mid-day.

5x8 Cargo weighs 900lb empty. I put maybe another 200lb into it - some bulky but light items like Ikea dresser and desk, plus a mattress and some soft things.

Interestingly enough - we know the OB has a 200lb tongue weight limit, but the 5x8 has a placard on it that says "Recommended loaded trailer tongue weight: min = 160, max = 390lb. So in the ideal world, you have about 40 lb tongue weight range to work with.

I probably had at most 100lb tongue weight, just under 10% of the load.

Highway speeds between here and there are 75 MPH limits. Elevation started about 5100' and ended at 1000'. Temps were 92F at the highest and averaged mid-80s. I kept the RPMs between 2500 and 3000. This kept the speeds between 65 and 70. Trying to maintain a 75 mph speed limit put the RPMs up around 4500 and that's higher than I wanted to maintain for anything other than a quick burst. I loaded the trailer with extra weight in front. On the highway it tracked straight and the nose didn't bob up and down.

I did not use the cruise control, I mainly watched RPM over MPH. It meant I stayed in the right lane and minded my own business.

Hills, and Kansas has them, do make for extra work and a greater appreciation for what semi drivers go through every day.

First tank got about 23 MPG. Next two tanks were 16 MPG. Final tank was 18 MPG. That last tank took me through areas where the speed limit was 65, 60, and 55. That extra 5-10 MPH adds a lot of wind resistance and a corresponding loss in MPG.
 

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5x8 Cargo = a single axle,. (I had to look that up ....5x10 Cargo is a double axle).

 

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Discussion Starter #5
I guess the 23mpg was coming down out of Colorado (and / or some favorable tail wind).

just think how much fun it would be to make such a run in a perfectly good C47 gooney.
It would have been way more fun in a C47. As it was, pulling that trailer was very similar to the feeling I got when I towed gliders - loss of power from pulling extra weight, the feeling of your a$$ end being pulled around whenever you hit a "bump", watching the engine instruments, scanning the view in the mirror, and the constant fore/aft feeling from the slack behind you being added and taken up.

Yeah, the 23 mpg was the first leg. You can only go so fast on I-25, so I didn't get the same MPG hit I got later at the higher speeds. And yes, I do get better MPG at altitudes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Another note from U-Haul concerning tongue weight.

Their trailer user guide has this recommendation:

>>>

Step 1: With the tow vehicle and trailer empty, and the trailer attached to your tow vehicle, measure the distance from the ground to the top of the trailer coupler handwheel.

Step 2: With the trailer fully loaded and the tow vehicle empty, measure the distance from the ground to the top of the trailer coupler handwheel.

Step 3: Subtract the answer in Step 2 from the answer in Step 1. (Answer 1 – Answer 2)

If your answer in Step 3 is greater than or equal to 1 inch, your trailer has enough tongue weight. If your answer is less than 1 inch, it is recommended that you reload your trailer, and put more weight in the front of the trailer. An answer less than 1-inch can cause sway or whipping.

<<<
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Remembered a few things:

I verified the oil level before and after the trip, no change. Keeping the RPMs maxed at 3000 let the engine and AT run only a little higher than on a normal highway trip. I wasn't letting the vehicle work any harder than it had to.

Also, MPG and miles until empty: I made a round trip. No trailer on the way out, I I had just hit +30 MPG, so when I filled up the miles to empty showed something like 700 miles. Sweet! Then it immediately dropped almost a hundred miles as soon as I pulled out of the gas station parking lot. I kept that gauge displayed while driving and used it as a marker for refueling stop planning. When you only get 16 MPG, you'll be stopping a lot. The good thing is that I can only go so far at a time without needing to get out and stretch my back anyway, so I topped off the tank at the same time.
 
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