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Subaru family,

Could use advise if it is good idea to undercoat new Subaru or not..... Is the underneath side such these days that it does not need it? Thanks in advance.
 

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18 Outback 3.6r Touring
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Undercoating is the path to the dark side. Undercoating leads to trapped moisture. Trapped moisture leads to rust. Rust leads to anger. Anger leads to suffering...
Ive used the rubber undercoating in a can from auto parts store and coated the plastic wheel wells once before. Just once. The thinking was it would help reduce road noise. It was more of pain to remove the wheels and then cover up the brakes and such so nothing would drip on them. Never really experienced any real benefits so I don’t waste time with it. As you noticed it doesn’t come from the factory that way and dealers no longer offer it and there aren’t many, if any, professional companies offering the service.
 

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The entire car gets dipped during assembly. Nothing you do after it leaves the assembly line will improve this. As mentioned if you trap debri under any of your after market coating all bets are off. It may even void any sort of rust warranty claim later. Just leave it, rinse it off regularly and enjoy
 

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2020 Hyundai Santa Fe Limited 2.0 T AWD
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I think undercoating is just a waste of money. Especially they way cars are manufactured these days. And I think many municipalities have gone away from using salt to de-ice roadways due to environmental concerns. It was a fad awhile back for dealers and automotive accessory stores used to separate you from your money. Kinda like siping tires.
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited, Crimson Red Pearl
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And I think many municipalities have gone away from using salt to de-ice roadways due to environmental concerns.
Here in NoVa, much of the road salt was replaced with brine. Even worse than salt. :frown2:
 

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2018 Outback 2.5i Limited
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Brine

Brine is a high-concentration solution of salt in water. In different contexts, brine may refer to salt solutions ranging from about 3.5% up to about 26%. Wikipedia
 

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2013 Outback, 2.5i Limited w/ Moonroof
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I can't speak for the '18 Outback, but the factory undercoating on my '13 did not cover as much as I felt it should. It covered the middle of the cabin, but faded towards the sides and corners. So I bought 2 or 3 cans of 3M Rubberized Undercoating and applied it. I am very happy with the results, and was pleasantly surprised with how similar in texture and appearance the 3M was to the factory coating.

There are some very important things to keep in mind when applying undercoating.

First, as pointed out above, it is critical to make sure all area where you are applying the undercoating is absolutely dry. For this reason, unless you have a heated garage I don't know that I would apply undercoating this late in the year. But be sure that everything is dry.

Second, it must also be clean. Very clean. You want the undercoating to be adhering to the body, not to dirt. This can make the difference between a temporary job and a permanent job.

Masking really isn't that hard, and at least on my cans the nozzles sprayed quite accurately, so the undercoating went where I was aiming. I only masked around the sides of the car. A little over spray anywhere else isn't a big deal. It will burn off the exhaust.

Although I was hoping for it to make the interior a little quieter, I can't say for sure that it did. But I would still do it again.
 

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2019 Subaru Forester Premium, Crystal Black Silica, Pkg 15
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What about using Fluid Film? I was thinking about tagging the bolts and stuff from the undercarriage with it regularly.
 

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2017 2.5i Premium Lapis Blue
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The terms are often used interchangeably, but there is a big difference between undercoating and rustproofing. Undercoating would primarily be for sound deadening and cosmetic purposes, as well as protecting exposed areas such as the floor and frame areas. Undercoating generally dries to the touch.

Rustproofing on the other hand is the more liquid products than never completely dry that protect inner areas like inside the doors, fenders, rocker panels, and quarter panels. Rustproofing generally doesn't completely dry and stays more of a tar or thick liquid consistency. The older black oil-based stuff used for years is still used pretty frequently I believe but a lot of the newer stuff is wax based, which seems to flow better into the problem areas.

Rustproofing does help but it is highly variable depending on how well it is applied. I would trust a dedicated rustproofing shop over anything applied by an employee at the dealer who probably spends more time washing and detailing cars.
 

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2019 Subaru Forester Premium, Crystal Black Silica, Pkg 15
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Right on. I'm planning on hitting the rear diff area and any visible bolts with the FF on the new ride. I've used it on my wife's trailer hitch to stop it from continuing to rust and it seems to do the job. The website also suggests using it on battery terminals but I have a CRC product for anti-corrosion.
 

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2011 Outback Limited 2.5i/2018 Crosstrek limited
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The extra protection offered by dealers is a money maker for them and a rip off for the consumer
 

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If you operate your car in an area where deicing chemicals such as rock salt, brine or calcium chloride are used, a product such as Rust Check , Krown or ATD 3000 , properly applied, will prevent rust and save your car from a premature death. If your car is not exposed to deicing chemicals, don't bother. Be aware that many oil based products will affect the rubber and insulation under your car, where as quality products will not.
Don't be fooled into getting an electronic rust control device, they do not work on cars, great for ships, not for cars.

www.rustcheck.ca
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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Sure, have the dealer do it for a small fee and while you’re there ask about ScothGuard for your seats 😂
 

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Brucey
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I wouldn't recommend the rubberized spray paint stuff but I have had excellent results with fluid film.

The only drawback is it has to be applied annually.
 

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2017 Outback Limited 2.5, Twilight Blue/Ivory, Eyesight. Also 1995 BMW 525i with 240,000 miles
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What about using Fluid Film? I was thinking about tagging the bolts and stuff from the undercarriage with it regularly.
Fluid fluid is excellent. I use it under my old BMW and spayed my OB shortly after my purchase. Still covering 4 years later in a moderate low salt environment. You can buy it from Lowes. BTW, a spray nozzle extender is available from Fluid Film. Highly recommended..

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Fluid-Film-11-75-oz-Lanolin-Based-Petroleum-Oil/50335157
 

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Sure, have the dealer do it for a small fee and while you’re there ask about ScothGuard for your seats 😂
I have never paid to have rustproofing applied. I have all the equipment needed and do it myself, to all our vehicle. Doing it myself allows me to take the time a shop could not take, and therefore I'm able to ensure the job is right. I remove all the finder liners and body plugs and spray all cavities.

I've have scotchguarded the interior of a few vehicles , but was not impressed with the results.
 

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2019, Subaru Outback Limited 3.6R
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