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2010 Outback 3.6R Limited (green)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a 2010 3.6 which drives great with the 19mm STI rear sway bar, but I've always felt that with having over 12inch front discs it didn't stop that well. I have used Hawk HPS pads in the past which were awesome, but are about $100 for a set of front pads for the 3.6. Plus, the Hawks took a long time to bed in before stopping well. I saw Stop Tech started making their own street performance pads which I found on Amazon for $60. I read several internet reviews that were all good and I know Stop Tech has a great reputation with racing brakes. I swapped out the pads myself yesterday. Easier than I thought. I had never messed with car brakes before, but Youtube walked me through it. It was easy. (Note to self: buy airwrench for next time!) I only have 18k on the car, so the rotors still look new with no grooving. I did not resurface or buy new rotors. These pads did not need bedding in, but I did it anyway, doing several long smooth stops from 35-50mph. These brakes are quiet just like the o.e. pads, but have much better feel and bite/stopping. An easy, highly recommended, cheap upgrade. I used Stop Tech part #309.10780 for 3.6's. (The 2.5's use #309.09290 about $45).
Brake Pads
 
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2011 OB 2.5i Prem CVT HK/AWP, Ruby Red Pearl
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Sweet, thanks for the tech.<O:p</O:p
Ceramics I presume? Why didn’t you do the set (rears too)?<O:p</O:p
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R Limited (green)
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Stop tech lists their pad material as: "Para-aramid composites", which I think is a Kevlar type pad rather than ceramic. Similar to most of the Hawk or EBC pads (not including their ceramics). Just personal opinion, but when driving it felt like I was not getting enough braking force from the big front brakes, plus the front does most of the braking anyway. I will probably upgrade the rear pads later, just wait for the o.e. pads to wear out. Swapping the fronts to a performance pad made the difference I wanted.
 

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2011 OB 2.5i Prem CVT HK/AWP, Ruby Red Pearl
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Gotcha’. I was thinking in terms of a matching/balanced pad-compound at all corners, but your report extends that all is well.
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R Limited (green)
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75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R Limited (green)
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I put about 250mi on these pads. Man they stop great! Now I wonder if I added the rear pads how it'd feel. Best $60 upgrade Ive made since the 19mm rear sway bar kit. Firmer brake pedal now, ton more bite, feels like my Outback will now stop on a dime. Still totally quiet & no dust.
 

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2010 Outback 3.6R Limited (green)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've put about 1k miles on the new front pads. They still stop great, even though I left the rear pads stock. They do make a pretty good amount of wheel brake dust though. Similar to what I see on German car's wheels. Rotors are fine. Still glad I did this cheap easy upgrade. Highly recommend. Bought wife a new Crosstrek, its brakes feel good as is.
 

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2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i Limited Graphite Gray Metallic with power moonroof, Auto dim rear view mirror & home link, Backup camera and Media hub
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Recently I use the Thermoquiet brake pads on my Sienna and Honda. They works great. There are ceramic brake pads (no dust). I will use it for my Outback when time comes. I buy them from AdvanceAutoparts

I've put about 1k miles on the new front pads. They still stop great, even though I left the rear pads stock. They do make a pretty good amount of wheel brake dust though. Similar to what I see on German car's wheels. Rotors are fine. Still glad I did this cheap easy upgrade. Highly recommend. Bought wife a new Crosstrek, its brakes feel good as is.
 

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2013 OB 3.6R SAP
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202 Posts
What you are feeling is the higher coefficient of friction of the StopTechs - basically, you get more brake power per pound of force you put into the brake pedal. Upgrading the rears would enhance that effect, but not by the same margin as upgrading the fronts.

Also, there is some logic to having the same pads at all four corners. Most people, when they feel the ABS engage, will stop adding force to the pedal once they feel it pulse. In a situation with with only the front pads upgraded, you may not bring the rears to the ABS threshold in a panic situation. It can be done - you just have to push more on the pedal in a panic stop, but again I think your instinct will be to stop pushing once the pedal pulses. I also wonder what the effect of imbalanced pads will have on a car with brake assist (does the 2010 have that?).

Be careful the first time you drive it in very cold weather - under those conditions, the first stop might actually take more force than the OEMs did, which can be surprising if you are not ready for it. The StopTechs are not a super aggressive pad, so hopefully it won't be an issue, but it's something to look out for if you take the car to the mountains in the winter, etc.
 

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How's the brake dust? I do like that the factory pads put out virtually no brake dust hence my wheels stay clean, but would not mind some improved braking feel.
 

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OBW H6 VDC, Tribeca, XT6
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absolutely no issue in running different pads front and rear.

people are going to like this comment...LOL...you could run different pads side to side and it wouldn't be noticeable by most consumers. countless times i've driven Subarus with malfunctioning calipers for a variety of reasons (actually Subaru Outbacks are notorious for the one front caliper pin bushing swelling and seizing into place, so only one pad grabs the rotor) - so you essentially only have one pad doing anything on one side, the other is hung and not doing anything. very common. by the way some people talk you would think that would cause massive issues....but it doesn't. extreme example, but arm chair banter about variances, which typically thrive in newer car circles like this, has no practical application in the real world.
 

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2011 Subie 3.6R Limited 2013 Cmax e=nergi PHEV
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absolutely no issue in running different pads front and rear.

people are going to like this comment...LOL...you could run different pads side to side and it wouldn't be noticeable by most consumers. countless times i've driven Subarus with malfunctioning calipers for a variety of reasons (actually Subaru Outbacks are notorious for the one front caliper pin bushing swelling and seizing into place, so only one pad grabs the rotor) - so you essentially only have one pad doing anything on one side, the other is hung and not doing anything. very common. by the way some people talk you would think that would cause massive issues....but it doesn't. extreme example, but arm chair banter about variances, which typically thrive in newer car circles like this, has no practical application in the real world.
So what do you do to remedy the sticky or stuck caliper. Replace it? Change the hardware? Lube? I have had that happen on my girl's Tiburon 2x on one of the front clamps.
 

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2013 OB 3.6R SAP
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LOL I was waiting for a comment like that. "It works just fine." But if the OP added 2 or 3 feet to his panic stopping distance, things won't be "fine" after he plows into some unforeseen object.

"Fine" and "optimum" are different concepts. With braking, you want "optimum." At least I do, and I'm simply pointing out that while the car feels like it has more braking power, it may, in reality, have slightly less in a panic situation. And, don't bring up track-day or road-racers that run different compounds front to rear. That's a different situation done for different reasons.

To me, running different pads front & rear on a daily-driven, non performance automobile is a bit like running different tires front and rear. Of course you can do it, things will be "fine" most of the time. But that one time you need 100% of the car, you might be sorry. It's an easy situation to avoid, so why not avoid it?
 

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Mine: '05 Legacy 2.5GT sedan; Hers: '12 Outback 3.6R Limited
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My 2005 Legacy 2.5GT has been running Stoptech pads front & rear for > 2k miles and am extremely pleased with them. The pads do dust more than the OEM units, but the initial bite feels better and they are quiet. The HAWK HPS pads that were on the vehicle before were noisy, dusted more, had an initial bite that felt the same as the Stoptechs and had the caliper backing plates delaminate from the pad backing plates.

I have not done any sort of braking tests (i.e. skidpad and stopping distances) as my vehicles are daily drivers. The pads were purchased due to great reviews stating that the initial bite feels like a noticeable improvement, and the OEM units were due for replacement.

I will be purchasing the Stoptechs for the OB during the winter quarter. The beauty between the 4th Gen LGT and the current Gen OB is that the front brake parts are interchangeable. They both share the same pad p/n.
 

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2011 Outback Premium 6MT
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My 2005 Legacy 2.5GT has been running Stoptech pads front & rear for > 2k miles and am extremely pleased with them. The pads do dust more than the OEM units, but the initial bite feels better and they are quiet. The HAWK HPS pads that were on the vehicle before were noisy, dusted more, had an initial bite that felt the same as the Stoptechs and had the caliper backing plates delaminate from the pad backing plates.

I have not done any sort of braking tests (i.e. skidpad and stopping distances) as my vehicles are daily drivers. The pads were purchased due to great reviews stating that the initial bite feels like a noticeable improvement, and the OEM units were due for replacement.

I will be purchasing the Stoptechs for the OB during the winter quarter. The beauty between the 4th Gen LGT and the current Gen OB is that the front brake parts are interchangeable. They both share the same pad p/n.
I would much prefer to push the pedal harder than to clean brake dust off my wheels. Fine for a track car, but pretty useless on the street.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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I would much prefer to push the pedal harder than to clean brake dust off my wheels. Fine for a track car, but pretty useless on the street.
yeah - definitely more dust

for close to the same 'everyday' type performance with less dust - go for the Centric PosiQuiet Ceramic.

great value so far on wife's 03 H6 OBW
 

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I would much prefer to push the pedal harder than to clean brake dust off my wheels. Fine for a track car, but pretty useless on the street.

+1 Hate brake dust.
 

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2013 OB 3.6R SAP
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^Agreed on the brake dust as well. If I were towing a trailer that did not have electric brakes I would upgrade the pads, at least for that trip, and deal with the dust.

But in general I'm happy with the responsiveness of the brakes on my '13 3.6. I can actually hustle it around more than I probably should - certainly more than I could on my '01 VDC.
 

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Mine: '05 Legacy 2.5GT sedan; Hers: '12 Outback 3.6R Limited
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Interesting about some of the claims with regard to brake dust with OEM pads.
The OEM pads on the LGT dusted quite a bit.

OEM = Dusty
Hawk HPS = Dustiest
Stoptech Streets = Dusty+

The OEM pads on the '12 OB seem to generate much less dust. Could also be hidden by wheel spoke thickness.

The OB wheel spokes are much fatter than the OEM wheels on the LGT, and even more so than the Prodrives that are now on the LGT.
 

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Tungsten 2017 2.5 Limited w Eyesight SOLD!
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At 40K miles the pads on my 3.6 are toast and I have the Stoptech's on order as well. I have never been through pads this fast before in my driving 'carreer'. My truck had 60 % left over after 105 K miles and that included towing even heavier loads than I am currently pulling. I know that car pads are thinner from the get-go but this is annoying to say the least. My mom's Gen3 OB had the same [email protected] 30K miles and she doesn't even tow anything....:eek:
Hopefully the new pads last a little longer...
 
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