Subaru Outback Forums banner
  • Hello Everyone! Let us know what you would spend a $50 Amazon gift card on, HERE For a chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card!
  • Submissions are now being taken for JUNE OUTBACK OF THE MONTH
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
1998 Subaru Legacy Outback
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My battery was low, I unconnected it and cleaned it with baking soda to eliminate the corrosion. After reconnecting the battery, the idle is racing and won't go down. It's at about 2k. I've read about how the computer has to relearn how to idle, and I've done what those people suggest, i.e. let it idle for 20 minutes, go for a short drive, try to disconnect and reconnect the battery a second time in case the computer had a problematic boot the first time around.

None of these help though. Any thoughts? Perhaps I just whacked something while getting battery in and out of the vehicle?

I had the guy at autozone pull the codes; there were many. It runs pretty good other than the idle . . .
 

·
Registered
1998 Subaru Legacy Outback
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The battery was corroded and was barely able to get the car started a couple of times. After I cleaned it, it's fine. I have a very short commute and I think it's not that good on the battery since it doesn't get much charging time and has to do lots of starts and stops.

I'll check the voltage, and post some codes when I get home tonight.
 

·
Registered
1998 Subaru Legacy Outback
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Battery reads 12 volts, 14 volts running, and 9 volts when cranking. All good, right? It's an older battery, but seems fine.

Codes (lots of codes):

P0101
P0301
P0302
P0341
P0601
P1100
P1107
P1120
P1141
 

·
Registered
1998 Subaru Legacy Outback
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Battery, when fully charged, should be at around 12.7 Volts. 12.0 is usually a partially discharged battery. But the 14 V running is good. It's possible the battery has a bad cell, and can't be charged fully, or perhaps, as you noted, it never has a chance to be fully charged given the short commutes. It might be best to use a charger to get it up to full charge, or at least see if it can be charged.
My multimeter is an small analog and I have to use the 50V setting, so I'm not sure my accuracy is good enough for differentiating between 12.7 and 12. As long as my car is turning over good this time of year, I can't see any reason to replace it. I guess I can have it tested at the battery shop to see.

The range of different, and seemingly unrelated, codes suggests they aren't real but are affecting the way the engine is controlled. They should be cleared, and then see what happens. If there is a real fault, one or more will come back. Otherwise the engine will probably settle down to normal operation.
Excellent. Seems to have worked like a charm. Thanks man.
 

·
Registered
1998 Subaru Legacy Outback
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Incidentally, your analog meter is fine for general work, but perhaps consider adding a digital multi-meter. They're relatively inexpensive, and will usually have the appropriate ranges for automotive work, including a low Voltage range that can be used to detect bad grounds in the charging system. Well worth it if you're going to be maintaining your car yourself.
I'll get a digital. High mileage subaru so I'm expecting to be doing some work. As for the code reader, the guy at autozone said his wouldn't clear codes but I went to NAPA and theirs would.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top