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2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
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Discussion Starter #1
It was raining in last Sunday, I made a fast left turn and my outback started to slid and hit the curb on the side of right tires. It was quite bad, the rim was bent and the steering was not centered.

The dealer replaced the rim, lots of parts in right front suspension, total cost about $2000. Now the car is having more vibrations in local, much more in speed around 40 mph.

I plan to bring the car back to dealer to have it check again. What should I tell them, other than the vibration I felt? I'm afraid they may just say it was normal.
 

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Master Caster
2005 XT, Mildly Modified...2006 XT Limited, Highly Modifed
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We kneed to know exactly what was replaced. The list will help determine what is next....

Possible wheel hub, but that's a huge guess. Post what has been done. Go from there.

At the worst, there may be unibody/frame damage
 

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2011 Subaru Outback 2.5i CVT
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Discussion Starter #3
Here is the relevant part of the bill

They didn't balance the tire, I think I'll ask them to check if there is any problem with the tire, like tire separation problems. I assume problems with tire is much more dangerous compare to problems in suspension.
 

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Tire balance, tire could be damaged if it is same. Another possibility is the axle could be damaged or bent. Your list looks comprehensive but was/is hard to read. Was knuckle replaced, tie rod damaged, alignment done, subframe checked for straightness?
 

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Can you post a picture of the damage after it occurred? Was the damage directly to the bottom of the wheel (6 oclock) or more front or rear of the wheel?

Tire...though it's hard to believe they didn't replace that given every thing else they scrapped?
Or the inner or outer tie rods.

A quick test would be to move the tire to the opposite rear corner and see if the vibration "moves" with the tire. If it changes dramatically then you know it's probably the tire, if not then you know it's something else. I would do this before taking it back to a place that couldn't repair something this easy with $2,000. That should be embarrassing.

That would be good and easy test that way you don't end up having them guessing with your wallet a second time.

1. They didn't replace or balance the tire?
2. They didn't replace the tie rods?

It looks like they just kind of guessed, it doesn't look like they actually diagnosed it well and may not have much experience with wrecked Subarus. More than likely you didn't need all of those components replaced, but that's water under the bridge now.

If the impact was substantial enough to damage everything they replaced then the axle needs checked as well, but that's highly improbable. More than likely they just substituted additional parts to cover lack of experience.

The part numbers on the listing indicate they replaced the following:
Control arm (comes with bushings and ball joint), knuckle (bearing housing), strut, bearing assembly, wheel, end link

Next time I'd suggest taking it to a body shop that repairs wrecked cars every day, if you can find a good one, they're a great resource. The only downside is depending on your area they can be flooded with high dollar insurance work and thus pricing and availability can be limited, but that varies wildly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The impact was totally on side of tire.

Recently I had another car backef up and hit the right front tire on higher locations. It was fixed in body shop of dealer in another location , and they just replaced tie rod and aligned the wheel, problem was solved.

I didn't bring car to same body shop this time because I can still drive it very slowly and the dealer is just 1 mile away.

Can you post a picture of the damage after it occurred? Was the damage directly to the bottom of the wheel (6 oclock) or more front or rear of the wheel?

Tire...though it's hard to believe they didn't replace that given every thing else they scrapped?
Or the inner or outer tie rods.

A quick test would be to move the tire to the opposite rear corner and see if the vibration "moves" with the tire. If it changes dramatically then you know it's probably the tire, if not then you know it's something else. I would do this before taking it back to a place that couldn't repair something this easy with $2,000. That should be embarrassing.

That would be good and easy test that way you don't end up having them guessing with your wallet a second time.

1. They didn't replace or balance the tire?
2. They didn't replace the tie rods?

It looks like they just kind of guessed, it doesn't look like they actually diagnosed it well and may not have much experience with wrecked Subarus. More than likely you didn't need all of those components replaced, but that's water under the bridge now.

If the impact was substantial enough to damage everything they replaced then the axle needs checked as well, but that's highly improbable. More than likely they just substituted additional parts to cover lack of experience.

The part numbers on the listing indicate they replaced the following:
Control arm (comes with bushings and ball joint), knuckle (bearing housing), strut, bearing assembly, wheel, end link

Next time I'd suggest taking it to a body shop that repairs wrecked cars every day, if you can find a good one, they're a great resource. The only downside is depending on your area they can be flooded with high dollar insurance work and thus pricing and availability can be limited, but that varies wildly.
 

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I can't imagine the tire being mounted on a new wheel and not being balanced.

If that is indeed the case, I would start with having the tires balanced.

I might also move the offending wheel to back of the car and see if the vibration moves.
 

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2016 2.5i Outback, 2002 Audi S4 Avant, 1980 CB750F Supersport, 1985 Carrera 3.2
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As stated, I would start with making sure it's balanced (look for wheel weights), switch it with another wheel and see if the vibration moves with, and then possibly a damaged/bent axle as well.
 

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On the Super Mod Squad
2002 3.0 VDC Wag + 2018 2.5 Leg Ltd
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The impact was totally on side of tire.

Recently I had another car backef up and hit the right front tire on higher locations. It was fixed in body shop of dealer in another location , and they just replaced tie rod and aligned the wheel, problem was solved.

I didn't bring car to same body shop this time because I can still drive it very slowly and the dealer is just 1 mile away.
based on your previous posts:

I guess you have some kind of 2011.

but you might click on the link next to the question-mark in my signature and fill out the "about my car" section.
(so you don't have to type year/ engine / trans out on every thread).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes it's a 2011 outback. I've updated my profile.

I knew about this wide spread problem and read some thread about it before. Many of them seemed to be felt in steering wheel, while the vibration I had this time is on passenger side, and we don't have this vibration before.

Today I drove with the mechanic who did the repair job, he said he didn't feel vibration. I asked for another mechanic and drove to highway, this time it's pretty obvious to see the vibration from my cell phone in AC vent holder at 55-60 mph. The vibration kind of caused a lateral movement (in the direction of left and right).

The 2nd mechanic said he will start from tire balancing, put it on road force, and look at other things.

The 1st mechanic said he did balance the tire, although I didn't see it listed in the bill.

The service manager in dealer said there will not be new charge for the repair they did, but said I need to pay if they need to replace some new parts. I argued with him a little bit since it was supposed to be fixed last time but to no avail.

based on your previous posts:

I guess you have some kind of 2011.

but you might click on the link next to the question-mark in my signature and fill out the "about my car" section.
(so you don't have to type year/ engine / trans out on every thread).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
They checked again and said the rear tire rim is bent. So the vibration was from the rear right side and transferred to front. They will replace the rim and balance the tire. Let's see if this fixed the problem.

They tried to charge for this again but I argued with them then they took it off. However I highly suspect not all the replacements are necessary in the first place, as the mechanic is incompetent, didn't find the 2nd rim problem when the most direct impact were on two tires.... But I guess this is difficult to prove. I did see the replaced old parts, some doesn't show an obvious problem but that's difficult to judge.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They replaced the rear rim, checked and balanced the tire. The vibration is less severe, but I still found some vibration around 55 mph. I test drove with the mechanic, he agreed there was slight vibration. I asked him about CV joints, he said it's a possible cause. Now I'm waiting for next Monday's result.
 

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So why do you keep taking your car to a tech you believe is incompetent?
 

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Double check both the tire pressure and the shocks. A duff damper along with an underinflated tire will often cause a self-energizing bouncing if the tire spring rate at that lower pressure is about equal to the spring rate ( at the tire) and it usually seems to happen at about 50-55 mph, depending on the tire rotation rate ( the rotation frequency has to match the suspension frequency). Can be cured by pumping the tire back up, and/or replacing the damper.

Had this happen to me decades ago with an old Datsun truck - the left front tire started bouncing like crazy, shaking the whole truck in the middle of rush hour traffic on 128 around Boston, and scared the **** out of me at the time. Pumped the tire back up to it's proper inflation pressure, and the bouncing disappeared.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
So why do you keep taking your car to a tech you believe is incompetent?
Because it's an unfinished repair and I can try to get them to work on it without additional cost, and I asked for a different mechanic for diagnosis.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
They said the problem was left front tire was feathered and not perfectly round, though not a safety concern. They switched left front and the right rear tire, but the vibration was still there.

I accepted the situation and picked up the car yesterday, then this morning the low tire pressure sensor light was on in highway. At first it flashed then kept steady on.

The dealer checked said the TPMS sensor were bad and need to be replaced, $85 x2 for parts. I'm confused because the car was in service for more than 1 week and mechanic, me test drove it more than 50 miles, the sensor never give a problem until today.

I have the suspicion that some mechanic broke the sensor in the switching tires, but they denied it and I can't prove it. Their explanation of why it didn't fail earlier is the weather.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I looked at the notes made by mechanic. It said the faulty sensors were the left front and right rear. Previously I thought it's still possible that the hitting curb damaged the sensor, but now the left front sensor had problem, and the exactly two sensors that they did the switch tire make me almost 100% certain it was some mechanic fault.

I asked these questions to service advisor, then asked to talk with the manager. Later I was told the manager "don't want to talk with me but said go ahead and do it".
 

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My son is a service advisor, you sound like the sort of customer he just loves to talk about over dinner.......>:)
 

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Do you mean the "trouble maker" sort? Did you find anything unreasonable in my case?
You're not doing anything wrong - this shop should have looked over all those issues and a bent wheel should have been apparent and inspected during a collision like that. Looks like they just visually inspected what parts looked damaged and replaced them as needed. Was the other vibration issue CV or axle related?

I just spent the past two weeks fixing a vacuum/boost leak on a low mileage BMW X5 which ended up being a mechanic who forgot to put on 2 intake manifold bolts and re-routed all the vacuum lines wrong. Unfortunately there are "certified" mechanics who don't deserve the title.
 
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