Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
is there a way that I should be warming up my 3.6 after a cold start before setting off? The idle stays high for awhile and doesn’t drop very quickly like other cars I’ve had. By today’s standards this engine is ancient (no direct injection, no auto start/stop, cylinder deactivation, etc). Should I wait till the idle drops below 1000RPM or just wait 30 seconds, put it in drive and drive away? I’d really want this motor to last a very long time so I’d like to take whatever precautions necessary to extend life.

Thanks all!
 

·
I simply cannot abide useless people.
2006 2.5i and 2002 3.0 wagons.
Joined
·
12,306 Posts
Drive and go. Don't floor it until it's up to temp, but other than that you're fine.
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Outback 3.6R Limited; 2" LP Aventure lift, LPA skid plates and small bumper guard, diff breather relocation, subframe skids; Motegi MR118 17x8et32 wheels; Yakima LoadWarrior with extension; ARB
Joined
·
318 Posts
I've always gone with the keeping the rpm's under 3k until the engine is warmed up (not just coolant temps, but oil temps). So basically, exactly what AWDFTW said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Drive and go. Don't floor it until it's up to temp, but other than that you're fine.
I've always gone with the keeping the rpm's under 3k until the engine is warmed up (not just coolant temps, but oil temps). So basically, exactly what AWDFTW said.
Thanks guys, so it’s basically what I was doing when I had my Mustang (no flooring it, shift at 2500, don’t go over 3000 until the oil temp is at normal, etc) good to know!
 

·
Registered
2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
Joined
·
6,184 Posts
What others said.

With modern engines and lubricants, there's overall less wear and tear if you just drive it reasonably, rather than leave it sit and idle for several minutes to reach operating temperature. Throw in the fuel consumption part of this into the equation as well, and the economics tip strongly toward just driving it.
 

·
Super Moderator
2016 3.6 Limited with ES
Joined
·
2,702 Posts
My prescribed method is to get in and start the car and after I snuggle my butt into the seat, play with the GPS and find my radio station I go.


Until the car gets up to the normal water temp I keep the RPMs at no more than 50% of max. After that, it's Subie power!
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Outback 3.6R Limited; 2" LP Aventure lift, LPA skid plates and small bumper guard, diff breather relocation, subframe skids; Motegi MR118 17x8et32 wheels; Yakima LoadWarrior with extension; ARB
Joined
·
318 Posts
Darn! I keep the revs under 3,000 almost always! I must be an Old Man now. :smile2:

Well, yeah, me too. And I did just turn 40... lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Something to keep in mind. Letting the car sit and idle doesn't warm up the transmission. So you still want to drive it easy to start with.
Does the CVT in the 3.6 use the same flow like the SJ Forester XT? If so, there is a transmission warmer in the Forester XT platform so it does "warm"...

That being said, letting a car sit and idle does nothing positive for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I never just sat and let my old car idle to warm up (2015 Mustang) I basically started it up, got myself situated and go. Was easy on it until the motor got up to temp. Was just curious with this new car, as I’m new to boxer motors and Subarus in general.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
That being said, letting a car sit and idle does nothing positive for you.
If I put the car in drive or reverse before it warms up enough to drop the RPM to 1000, I get a slight screech from, what I assume is, the belt in the transmission.


Let me add, letting almost any engine idle for a few minutes does nothing negative for you either. Engines are most efficient at or near their designed working temperatures because all the parts have expanded to designed spec. Todays engines are much more efficient while cold, but allowing some temperature rise is always better.


Beary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
If I put the car in drive or reverse before it warms up enough to drop the RPM to 1000, I get a slight screech from, what I assume is, the belt in the transmission.


Let me add, letting almost any engine idle for a few minutes does nothing negative for you either. Engines are most efficient at or near their designed working temperatures because all the parts have expanded to designed spec. Todays engines are much more efficient while cold, but allowing some temperature rise is always better.


Beary
If you have a 3.6, it is a chain...(correct me, I think it is the HT CVT system like the WRX and Forester XT SJ) you shouldn't hear any screeching as far as I know..

It is an interesting debate because idling an engine wastes gas if you do it for more than a minute or 2. Now, if the system works like the other HT CVT, then there is a transmission warmer. It is a liquid to liquid warmer using the engine coolant. If coolant can warm while idle, then idle is good... but it warms best when it is running...

that being said, don't hammer down until you've driven for a bit ;)
 

·
Registered
2018 3.6R Touring
Joined
·
363 Posts
This reminds me that my daughters' Foresters both have a blue dash light that stays on until the engine reaches normal operating temp. Had us buffaloed for a while. What's up with that?
 

·
Registered
2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
Joined
·
7,114 Posts
Letting the car sit and idle doesn't warm up the transmission.
Incorrect. The TR580 CVT fitted to 2.5 models even includes a heat exchanger system designed to warm as well as cool the fluid. That said, like the engine oil the CVT fluid will warm faster when moving than when just sitting at idle.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top