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2016 Limited 3.6R
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298 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am thinking of having my headlights film protected as the lights on my old forester kept fogging even though I would buff them clean time and time again. Looking to prevent this at least for a little longer.

The Weather Tech Lampgard is $80CAD for headlight and fog lights. A local shop will install a 3M film for $100CAD. Curious if anyone has used the Weather Tech, 3M or other and has any thoughts on the films?
 

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Super Moderator
2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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7,813 Posts
I'm not familiar with the Weather Tech films, and I only use a Sylvania restoration kit, not protective films. This has a UV protective that is applied after the final buffing.

If you are just buffing the lenses and not applying any UV protectant afterward, there are two issues I see:
1) Micro scratches from the last abrasion step are still there in the plastic.
2) It will start degrading again very quickly.

Try a restoration kit first, and see if that gives you better results. It's much lower cost.
 

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2010 2.5 CVT Limited
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1,913 Posts
So long as it has a UV blocking characteristics, it should delay the degradation of the plastic.
 

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Premium Member
2019 3.6R Limited Grey/Grey
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44 Posts
I have had 3M on several cars and it is on my 19 OB. Good stuff.
I would polish your current lenses to a high level of clarity then
put on 3M. Should last a long time. IMHO Good luck.
 

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2020 Outback Limited Green
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226 Posts
I’ve also come across the Laminate-x headlight film. I wonder if anyone here has experience with those. Those go for $60
 

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'18 Outback Touring 3.6R, '11 Legacy 3.6R Limited. '11 WRX not stock
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563 Posts
We had the clear 12 mils. thick Lamin-X installed on the headlights on our '11 Legacy when the paint protection was installed. She lives outside 24/7 and the lights are still very clear.
So pleased with how well it all held up we had our '18 OB done too. Money well spent IMHO.
 

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2015 Outback 2.5i Limited, Ice Silver/Black
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2,453 Posts
I really don't know why, but I've never had issues with fogging lenses. Obviously my cars have been outside daily during daylight hours, though I don't live in the desert. Traded my last cars at 12 and 13 years of age. I've seen cars of the same model/vintage as mine with totally fogged lenses where my own have been perfect. Is it automatic car washes and chemicals used? I remember when I had a ragtop MG that I was told not to use any cleaners with ammonia in them to clean the vinyl rear window as it would fog them. I never give my lenses any special treatment short of washing, never any wax or polish.
 

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2020 Outback Limited Green
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226 Posts
We had the clear 12 mils. thick Lamin-X installed on the headlights on our '11 Legacy when the paint protection was installed. She lives outside 24/7 and the lights are still very clear.
So pleased with how well it all held up we had our '18 OB done too. Money well spent IMHO.
Do you recall how much you paid? You can buy it for $60 online but that’s for DIY installation.
 

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'18 Outback Touring 3.6R, '11 Legacy 3.6R Limited. '11 WRX not stock
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563 Posts
Do you recall how much you paid? You can buy it for $60 online but that’s for DIY installation.
Sixty bucks is a bargain if it's quality material and headlights should be a simple install. Our package price was around $1K.
 

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Outback 1: 2015 2.5i Limited. Option 23, PP5, Hitch. Ice Silver. Outback 2: 2015 2.5i Limited, Option 23, PP5, Carbide Gray.
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1,022 Posts
I have used X-Pel headlight and paint protection films for many years. The films are on both of our 2015 Outbacks and is still in excellent condition. No yellowing of headlights or the film. You should ahead of time that application of the film on headlights is a bit tricky due to thickness of the film and the shape of headlights. X-Pel has excellent videos to explain/show the process.
 

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66 Posts
So long as it has a UV blocking characteristics, it should delay the degradation of the plastic.
As I said in an earlier post about paint protection today. You can save your car's paint and plastic headlight covers by the simple act of keeping it parked in the garage as much as possible. My 10 year old Outback had clear, unfogged plastic headlights. I would simply wax them often with Mequiar's and always, during the day and night park in the shade of the garage. The garage could get very hot but that seemed to matter very little compared to parking in the bright sun. I have neighbors who park their cars facing south getting stronger sun year round and their paint and headlights look awful. Neighbors across the street part facing north and while their paint is fading their headlights are only lightly hazy. PARK IN THE GARAGE AND SAVE MONEY AND GRIEF OF WATCHING YOUR CAR LOOKING CRAPPY!
 

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Premium Member
2016 Outback Premium 2.5 CVT w/EyeSight+SRVD
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7,594 Posts
The garage could get very hot but that seemed to matter very little compared to parking in the bright sun.
It's the strong ultraviolet component of sunlight that's most responsible for degradation of plastic headlight covers and a lot of other materials. The ultraviolet in sunlight also kills many bacteria, and causes sunburn and some skin cancers.
 

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2020 Legacy Premium
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84 Posts
It's the strong ultraviolet component of sunlight that's most responsible for degradation of plastic headlight covers and a lot of other materials. The ultraviolet in sunlight also kills many bacteria, and causes sunburn and some skin cancers.
Kills COVID too!
 
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