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2020 Limited XT
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49 Posts
What made you go with the OB?
The overall cost of ownership.
  • V90 XC requires premium unleaded, OB XT requires regular.
  • V90 XC comes standard with 19" wheels and tire options are almost nil (tire rack only lists three options), the OB XT has a bunch of options for tires.
  • V90 XC insurance costs are much higher than the OB XT.
  • No aftermarket options for just about anything on the V90 XC, and what is available is $$$$$
Another biggie is when I went to test drive one at CarMax. The one I was looking at had a crack on the dash. Granted the car was still under warranty and it would have been replaced without cost. My thought is if it happened once at a 30k miles, what's to stop the next one from happening at 60k miles?

The Volvo was nice to drive and it is a little faster than OB.
When it comes to value for the money the OB blows the Volvo out of the water.
 

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2020 Outback Touring XT / Nappa brown interior
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169 Posts
Nothing as for my wife’s Mother’s Day gift and how she travels, this fit her needs all around.
 

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'17 Outback Limited 3.6R in Venetian Red.
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444 Posts
WRX. Not big enough for my family, and because of chronic pain I can't drive manual transmission cars anymore :( I miss the speed and handling if I had a WRX, but the OB is more comfortable, luxurious and reliable IMO.
 

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2020 Outback Touring XT, in Crystal White Pearl
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895 Posts
My short list came down to the Mazda CX-5 (an upper trim level, with the turbo), a RAV-4 Hybrid, and the Outback. I wasn't totally convinced I needed an XT at first, but two test drives convinced me. I would have been OK with either a Limited XT or a Touring XT, but am happy I opted for the Touring. (Part of it is that I wanted a white OB, and if I had gotten a Limited I wanted the Ivory leather. These were actually in shorter supply than the Touring XTs, which only come with the Jave Brown interior (which I like the look of, a lot...).

The Mazda drove nicely, but was a bit small, in terms of cargo and rear-seat room, and I also thought that the infotainment system was a bit outdated looking. The Rav-4 Hybrid was pretty nice, but for some reason I have a hard time in warming up to Toyotas....

IF the Honda CR-V Hybrid had been out at that time, it would have received strong consideration. CR-V's seem just a tad "wimpy" to me, in terms of their "vibe", but the CR-V Hybrid drive train is really nice. (We have a 2018 Accord Hybrid with the same drive-train, albeit without AWD. It is very well done, being fairly quick, and with very little "hybridness" to it.....)

I also considered some more luxury brands and models, primarily the Audi Q5, Volvo XC60, and Acura RDX. But in the end, a loaded-up Outback had all of the features (or more), when compared to the luxury brands, and (for me) just represented better "bang for the buck". That said, all three of the above are very nice vehicles.

My prior Outback (a 2010 3.6R Limited) had served me well, for 10 years and 224,000 miles, so that also predisposed me to another OB. (Actually, this is the first time I have ever bought the same make of car, twice in a row, let alone the same model.....)
 

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2020 Onyx XT
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44 Posts
I've been wanting an Outback since 2007, but life and situation prevented it. My wife, while agreeing on the looks and capability of the Outback, suggested that we check out some alternatives just in case things turn out not the way we expected from catalogs and YouTube reviewers. Prior to picking up the Onyx XT, we checked out the following:

Toyota Rav4: Overall not a fan with lack of Android Auto at the time of review, and that was one of the main reasoning why I passed on it.
Honda CRV: Nice in and out, more suv than car
Subaru Forester: Wanted a better built car as in the Outback, but it came really close between deciding the Onyx and the Sport. Had the Forester Sport come with a Turbo, it would have given a slight advantage over the Outback
Audi Alltrack: Impressed with acceleration and drivetrain, less impressed with outdated electronics and entertainment console. Reasoned that if this is a car that I'm going to pretty much be the only driver on roadtrips, then it should be comfortable and easy to use too.
 

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2016 Outback 2.5 Limited, Ice Silver and 2020 Outback Limited XT Cinnamon Brown
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122 Posts
We seriously considered a Kia Telluride, Toyota Venza, Hyundai Palisade and a Toyota Highlander. Oh and my wife let pretend a Kia Stinger was an option for a minute or two. Looked at Mazdas but interiors were a little small for us and seemed a little outdated.

Took them all for rides. Negotiated best prices. Besides the OB the Telluride was our favorite. Airy cabin, quiet ride, nice leather, quite a bit of tech. But Kia dealerships, at least in our area, refused to negotiate on the sticker price and we weren't going to pay full sticker price for a Kia or anything else for that matter.

The OB was the best value for the money out of all of them and after having it for 5 months now we are very glad we didn't choose one of the others. Although I do have a love/hate relationship with the infotainment system.

Plus this is our 5th new Subaru in 7 years and we really like them.



We currently have a 2018 Outback (our first Subaru), and are considering another one when the 2021 model year comes out. I've done some online vehicle comparisons, and so far the Outback is winning.

What other vehicles did you seriously consider before buying your Outback?

m
 

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2020 Outback Touring XT in Autumn Green
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184 Posts
This is our first Subaru. I wanted another sedan, and I wanted more trunk space than what we have now in our aged Altima. We were more actively doing camping at that point, and I wanted a roomier trunk along with a more comfortable ride. But parking on the street, I didn't want anything much longer than the Altima.

I was liking the idea of a hybrid. I started out enamored of the idea of an Avalon or even a Camry, and then the Accord caught my eye and I spent some months focused on those. But eventually I came to my senses, and started obsessing over the Outback last fall. And as it happens, the length of the Outback turns out to be half an inch shorter than the Altima*.

I may never go camping again 😢, but I do have the perfect car for it anyway.

*Looking at the specs on the Edmunds site, it shows the Outback being .2" smaller than the Altima. That's gonna open up a world of parking spots for me!
 

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31 Posts
We didn’t consider any other makes, but we did think about different crossover models in the Subaru lineup: Crosstrek, Forester and Outback (the Ascent was a little too big and unnecessary for my parents as they still have a Toyota Sienna minivan). Everyone’s situation is different, but we were shopping for a replacement vehicle for my mom’s 2002 Toyota Camry (the last car she ever bought brand new in 2001). We were a family with a deep history of Toyotas, with a Mazda or 2 (and even a Chevy conversion van for a brief amount of time) sprinkled in the 38 years my parents have lived here.

Anyway, it was my love for Subaru that started the whole conversion process from Toyota to Subaru. I’m on my 2nd WRX with the first one being totaled following 2 major accidents a rear-end hit and run who managed to successfully escape, followed by a jackknife accident by a truck whose driver was not paying attention to a red light before careening into my WRX turning on a green arrow. Now, anyone who has been in any sort of major accident in their Subaru will probably tell you that they believe their car saved their life. And I have seen some of the gnarliest accidents where drivers should not have survived who did. I think that coupled with the fact that I haven’t had any other major issues with either of my WRXs, that the engine layout is the most advantageous between inline, flat, V- and rotary leading to the most balanced one with some of the lowest centers of gravity, the AWD system is a real AWD system and not just a system in name alone (i.e. not a FWD-based system that decides to send power to the rear axle like most common ones outside of Audi, Mercedes, Porsche, etc.), the Subaru community is one of the most unique and charity-oriented, and that it’s not the most common car down (like Toyotas and Hondas and others) here in FL all lead me to push my parents toward the brand. That being said, their cars are not perfect (i.e. Stop/Start and CVT programming to mention just a few). And while most of us Subaru drivers recognize that, a lot of us will put up with their quirks anyway.

Sorry for that essay above, but between the Crosstrek, Forester and Outback, my mom posited that this may be her last car purchase ever (as we tend to keep our cars until the wheels literally fall off or someone totals them and don’t want to keep having a monthly car payment every month) that may eventually just be the only car my parents would own (if the Sienna were to be gone). So she wanted a change, not only from Toyota, but also to an SUV/Crossover from a Sedan. So I got to thinking that the current generation 2020 Outback Touring XT would be the best choice for her. The FA24DIT motor in that vehicle and the Legacy (as well as the Ascent) are punchy and allow for passing and merging with ease. Also, the Outback is probably the most unique shape as you do not see what essentially is a big station wagon in the market (except in more luxury car brands like Volvo or Mercedes and BMW). That being said, it has impressive interior and cargo room and for a car that would potentially need to be the only car in an middle-age/elderly couple’s garage, it’s the best one in their lineup, barring the Ascent. Also with the 2020 Outback Touring XT, Subaru included some features not found on other models in their lineup, which some people may also find gimmicky, like their DriverFocus system, power-folding side mirrors (also found on higher trims of the Ascent), front view camera (also found on higher trims of the Ascent and new Legacy) and hands-free power rear gate. On that note, I do wish that they did include a 360-degree camera like Toyota and other makes have started introducing in their lineup, but that’s neither here nor there. So, features alone, I think the Outback compared to the Crosstrek and Forester was the natural choice. Also, just for comparison between Forester and Outback (as that was the main decision my mom had to make), the Outback is not as tall and top-heavy (although it does maintain the same 8.7” of ground clearance) due to its design as a wagon and not a traditional SUV, which actually makes it ride and handle more like a sedan like she was used to prior. The roof rail system is also unique on the Outback than any of their other models as it is built-in.

I hope this helps. I apologize for some of the rambling of this post. But whatever you choose, I know you’ll make the right decision for you.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

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We currently have a 2018 Outback (our first Subaru), and are considering another one when the 2021 model year comes out. I've done some online vehicle comparisons, and so far the Outback is winning.

What other vehicles did you seriously consider before buying your Outback?

m
Honda CR-V (couldn't get past the digital gauges), Toyota RAV-4 (liked the Outback better, particularly interior), and Mazda CX-5 (Mazda better looking but Mazda's long term status in US is more tenuous). Overall, Outback checked all the boxes for me: elevated ride height while still feeling/driving more like a sedan, safety features, latest technology, and I got a really good deal on one.
 

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2020 Limted XT Black/Ivory
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679 Posts
So many people cross shopping the CX-5 and passing because it’s slightly too small. I am in the same boat. My mom has a CX-5 signature. That motor is awesome and it’s an absolute rocket ship, but it’s way too small. If they resurrected the CX-7, i bet it would seriously cut into Outback sales.
 

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2020 Outback Limited
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405 Posts
So many people cross shopping the CX-5 and passing because it’s slightly too small. I am in the same boat. My mom has a CX-5 signature. That motor is awesome and it’s an absolute rocket ship, but it’s way too small. If they resurrected the CX-7, i bet it would seriously cut into Outback sales.
Yeah I sat in the CX-5 too but just found it a little tight all around. Plus there aren't a ton of Mazda dealers around anymore for service. My test is to see how I fit in the back seat behind myself, and found the back seats were kinda cramped too as well as not having a ton of cargo space. It's a nice looking vehicle though, there's a reason why you see so many of them around.
 

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2020 Outback Onyx XT, 2007 Outback 2.5
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115 Posts
Big list:
Mazda CX-5 (too small)
Mazda CX-9 (don't want 3-row)
Toyota 4Runner (poor mpg)
Toyota Rav4 (seems expensive for what it is, a bit small)
Toyota Highlander (used or new leased -- expensive)
Volvo XC70 (used)
VW Atlas
VW Tiguan
Subaru Crosstrek (small)
Subaru Ascent (wide, didn't find it particularly comfortable)
Hyundai Santa Fe/Kia Sorento (great value but long term reliability unknown)

Short list:
VW Alltrack (probably too small, ultimately this is replacing a Suburban)
Honda Passport (concerned suspension may be too stiff off pavement, may be wider than I want driving in cities
Outback Premium (concerned about lack of power but mainly decided rear passenger air vents would be needed)

Final answer:
Outback Onyx. Concerns about fuel economy, the longevity of the turbo engine, and the likelihood of carbon deposits on valves. Aside from that, it seemed like the best overall compromise.
 

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2020 Onyx Edition, Storm Trooper White
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336 Posts
I considered for 2 years:
#1 Grand Cherokee Trailhawk, 2018 and 2019. Test drove it and it was pretty good. Had everything I wanted: large gas tank (almost 25 gallons), full size spare wheel. However, BIGGEST concern was the air suspension. Our new car was meant for snow so the last thing I needed was an air suspension issue and there were a number of reports that raised my eyebrows. I have driven Jaguars to the snow with air suspension and we experience issues there in the extreme cold. As well, even with the best deal, it was more $$ than the wife wanted to spend on a car.

#2 4Runner. Looked really good but when we physcially checked the interior, my wife hated the way the back seat folded time, taking up a whole bunch of space.

The Outback was not even considered until I happen to come across the Onyx edition while surfing.

The look was FABULOUS, nice large infotainment screen, full size spare wheel, front camera and all the tech I wanted in a vehicle.I knew the AWD was legendary so no need to question that and NO air suspension issues to deal with.

Some concerns about Boxer engine & reliability but then I figured, every car has its weakeness - the trick is to find one that is least concerning to me. Outbacks lasts but this was a completely new platform from the prior gen. I was already used to the idea of a CVT since my old car, the CMax had CVT and I had zero issues with it, very smooth & refined and great MPGs

I think what sealed the prelimary deal was the turbo in the Outback. I wanted a car with decent power, may be some decent MPG but power.

Then when my wife & I looked at the real car. Drove the car, very solid handling (even now, I still admire how well this car drives, great grip with the AWD and nice power to push the corner. Not perfect sportslike but hey, this is awagon FFS).

While we were there, the car we were driving got sold underneath us. No big deal - as at least I would get a real "new" car. $ looked good. SOLD.

So, Jan 2 took delivery of the car. Had a slight TPMS issue but other than that, its been a great car & even better now with the 504 update, AC/DC "Thunderstruck" never sounded so good :)
 

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2020 Onyx XT
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960 Posts
On my first one, Jeep Grand Cherokee was the closest competitor. Honda CRV and Yota Rav4 got brief looks but were eliminated quickly.

It was a great vehicle for me so this time around, I was replacing an Outback with an Outback and not much got a look. I would like a mid-size truck in my future, but while the kids are young, not yet.
 

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So many people cross shopping the CX-5 and passing because it’s slightly too small. I am in the same boat. My mom has a CX-5 signature. That motor is awesome and it’s an absolute rocket ship, but it’s way too small. If they resurrected the CX-7, i bet it would seriously cut into Outback sales.
Exactly. I traded in a CX-7 for the Outback. It was a great car and about all I ever did to it was routine maintenance. However, both of our cars were getting older so I wanted to replace one before they both needed to be replaced. The CX-5 was significantly too small for my needs and the CX-9 was far larger than I wanted. If they still had something the size of the CX-7 in the lineup it would have started at the top of the list. Instead they introduced the CX-30 which looks like a replacement for the CX-3 to me even though Mazda insisted it isn't. My wife's car is a 2009 Mazda 6. I had planned to trade it first but my wife loves that car and has no interest in replacing it right now.
 

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2020 Onyx Edition, Storm Trooper White
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336 Posts
Sorry, off topic, but did you go with the RF stereo upgrade?
No. In hindsight, perhaps I should since I also wanted the under guard as well but the wife put the kabosh on it. Plus it would have been more weeks for the build as the Onyx was hard to get here in LA at that time.
 

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4,337 Posts
I considered the Crosstrek but it didn't have a turbo.

I considered the Forester but it didn't have a turbo.

I considered a WRX but it doesn't have a hatch.

I considered the Ascent but it was too big.

Loving the Outback XT.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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5,941 Posts
A Baja was the only other vehicle considered, and only for a couple minutes. This was in late 2004, when I bought my first 2005 Outback, and I was swayed by the sleek looks of the then-brand-new Gen 3 Outbacks versus the stuck-in-Gen 2-Baja. I was also swayed by the fact that some of the Gen 3 models were monotone, versus the loud two-tone colors on all Bajas I saw on the lot - and they did have quite a few.

And although I was coming from mini-pickup and liked the concept of a Baja as a small hauler, I made a quick decision based on looks only, and have never looked back.

Had they brought the Baja along with the Gen 3 design and made some of them monotone, it might have had a different outcome.
 

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2017 Outback Premium 2nd Subaru owned
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267 Posts
I really wanted a Lincoln or the Ford Explorer. I have rented many of them on trips. Every one has been outstanding. Even the one that I got stuck with that had 50k miles on it and still had the original tires. It was the only Explorer left (Budget rental ) on a holiday week. Looking at new ones here, the Ford dealer here was unreasonable. His way or the highway. I had just sold my 03 OB. and was fed up with head gasket problems and other soon to be major expenses.. The Subaru dealer was just down the street and had 0 % financing. I talked with Subaru and within 30 minutes had the car deal done with a huge discount. About the easiest car deal ever. I like the Subaru. Still want an Explorer, maybe an Assend. I like not having car payments !
 
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