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'Replaced' cabin air filter

I followed instructions from https://www.carcarekiosk.com/video/..._Limited_3.0L_6_Cyl./air_filter_cabin/replace

After dropping the glove box they describe a panel that's removed by removing its rivets, however there was no panel so it wasn't easy to pull the holder backwards. The glove box is surrounded by a black frame that's screwed in using 2 screws. I removed those and was able to unclip the upper right hand corner which provided a bit more room to pull out the holder.



When I pulled the holder there was no air filter installed, probably never had been installed. I was able to insert the new filter without too much trouble.

 

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For those who care, I spent a lot of time looking for a cargo box. I got it specifically for skiing and needed one to fit big skis but this might also be the largest box on the market that will clear the lift gate with spoiler.

Thule motion xt xl. My front cross bars are in the holes up front even though they technically aren't supposed to be. Maybe a half inch clearance. I know there are used boxes but it's hard to find clearance numbers and fit 200cm skis.
That looks very nice. I too spent a lot of time looking for a box and also need to fit 200cm skis. I went with the Thule Pulse Alpine because it also needs to fit in the garage. The tail gate spoiler hits the box so I used a rotary tool to extend the slits backwards, allowing the box to mount more forwards. Arguably less sturdy but it's been through high winds with no issues. Added 'bonus' is that the moon roof opens completely. And I can now keep my steaks chilled in the box while driving home from the market, at least in winter.
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... My front cross bars are in the holes up front even though they technically aren't supposed to be. Maybe a half inch clearance. ...
I checked the (2005) owners manual and there's no mention of not using the holes up front (or the rear for that matter). I'm guessing if it's hazardous they would have somehow filled the holes?
 

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You know. I may have misinterpreted. The photos in my manual show it behind the holes and say to make sure it's ten inches behind/in front of the ends of the rails. I just assumed.
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It's more like I overlooked that. 2005 manual says the same:
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It almost looks like they designed the supports to allow you to use the holes, but I guess the 10" restriction still applies.
 

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Hadn't driven my outback for about 6 months because I've been driving my legacy which recently started developing a noisy (manual) transmission. Back to the outback while I ponder on what to do with the legacy. But the outback still had studded snow tires so I needed to get some all seasons. While driving to discount tire, the outback started shaking and jerking. CEL came on. Made it to discount tire and my reader says P305, cylinder 5 misfire detected. Decided to drive to a subaru mechanic where I used to live, some 40 miles away. Made it to the mechanic but they couldn't schedule me for today, and definitely didn't want to work around the engine while it was still hot. So I asked them "can I do it myself?" and they said yes. So they gave me tools to remove the coil pack, which was clearly bad. They gave me a used coil pack I could use to replace the faulty one, gave me an extra (used) coil pack in case another coil goes bad, and a (used but fairly clean) spark plug in case a coil damages a spark plug. Most importantly, I got some guidance. Never replaced a single coil let alone spark plug on this 6 cylinder. Wasn't that difficult but I also got the right tools, like a swivel ratchet with a swivel extension with a jointed spark plug socket, making it fairly easy to get the socket on the plug. Replacing the coil fixed the issue and when I asked them what I owed them they told me it was free. Would even better if my engine was cooler (bit painful at times), but beggars can't be choosers. Coil on the left is what came out and coil on the right is what went in (coil in the background is the spare I received), all made by Diamond:

Motor vehicle Gas Auto part Electrical wiring Metal


The spark plug tool:

Bicycle fork Automotive exhaust Bumper Wood Automotive tire


Even made it to discount tire. Got some Michelin Defenders (T+H). And I got them with the an H speed rating because I really can't stand the V rating it's supposed to have (very noticeable when switching to and from snow tires). These Michelins seem a bit noisy, but I had the same initial impression last time I got Michelins (MXsomething Primacy), which turned out to be that the tires were actually so quiet that I was hearing my drive shaft.

Edit: picture of the tool
 

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Which cylinder?
5. Most rear on the passenger side.

Please share the name and location of this shop. They seem like outstanding folks!
I've had my gen2 serviced by them, but that was years ago. After replacing the coil pack I asked for a quote for the transmission issue on my legacy which seems like a heavy lifting job I don't want to do myself. $ 1600 parts and labor if they have to replace all the clutch area parts, which is probably the issue. More than 3x times than what I paid for my legacy! Everything seems expensive with a car that came this cheap.

 

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... now I just have to find a place with a press that's willing to press the old ones out and the new ones in. The first two local shops I called said they don't have a press, they just replace the whole control arm. For the price of a new control arm I could buy a 12 ton harbor freight press myself!
They tend not to replace just the bushings because they may get in trouble removing the old bushings which could result in them having to tell the customer that they should just replace the entire arm, together with labor trying to get the old bushing out that goes wasted or else adds to the customer bill. Even with an easy bushing replacement job, the labor may come close to getting a new arm with new bushings pre installed. A shop here wanted $ 60 labor per bushing (I'm sure you can find a place that does it cheaper) for my (front) lower control arms (4x bushings = $ 240) so I indeed got a hf 20 ton press. You may have to add the price for a sleeve kit (~ $ 70 130) if you can't use sockets or whatever you have lying around to press the bushings in and out. I sprayed the bushing area with either wd40 or pb blaster twice over a period of 2 weeks before I started pressing the bushings out. Wasn't too difficult but will probably vary depending on your level of rust and other conditions.

Also noticed the bushings on my rear struts didn't look so hot, despite being only year-old KYB units. Anyone else seen this/know if it's bad?
Seems to be pulling the bushing a bit out. Curious if the other side shows the bushing being pulled in. Doesn't look great but it doesn't look that bad either. Mine are worn down (with over 90K miles) resulting in repeated clunking if the road is not smooth enough. I'll be replacing the entire strut.

Edit: Sleeve kit prices seem to have gone up significantly
 

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... installed Michelin X-ice on crosstrek wheels ...
Very nice setup.

Just in case; if the wheels in the picture are mounted at the corners shown in the picture, it would seem the rear wheel would have its (directional) tire treads pointing backwards. I'm sure it's just shown this way for the photo shoot and I'm just being a pedant.
 

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Lazily looking into a P0420 which I've had since owning the car. Had an emissions test in the first year of ownership which passed (I'd like to say with flying colors, but I can't recall). I've always just cleared the code, just like on my gen2. Recently I've been noticing mini-detonations, seemingly in the exhaust. Could have something to do with not driving the car for ~6 months or so, which is around or just before I started noticing the detonations. Thought it was bad fuel but I've gone through 8-10 tanks of (91) gas since then. I really notice the detonations after some time of driving and for the most part when at a standstill at the stop light. On occasion I notice it while driving but less so when the engine is under load. Started to measure O2 sensors which so far is not showing the sensors being bad, but I have to take more measurements. Also had a bad coil pack not too long ago. I've been hearing that once one goes, the rest may follow shortly thereafter. Have to eventually pull and inspect the remaining 5 coil packs.

Today, I just unplugged the MAF sensor with the intent to clean the bulb. When I removed it I noticed the O-ring (on the left in the picture) was broken. Curious if some pieces of that broken O-ring ended up being sucked into the engine. In any case, I cleaned the bulb which had some black/carbon-like caking on one side (can't recall if it was the up- or downstream side). Found an O-ring in my truck's power steering service kit which is shown in the picture. That was actually too large as the sensor would not fit in the intake hose. Found another O-ring in some universal O-ring kit I have. Seemed too small but it actually did fit, while allowing the sensor to snugly fit in the intake hose. For comparison, I inserted the sensor into the intake hose without any O-ring and noticed it would move around. With the O-ring I'm now using it effectively has no wiggle room and seems to be well sealed. Interesting that there is no O-ring listed for the parts around the intake, and the sensor itself (over $ 170 at the dealer!) doesn't show an O-ring. Took it for a short drive and I'd like to say it's running better but it could be a placebo effect. Need some more driving to see if this made a difference. Remind me to pick up some O-rings next time I'm at the parts store.

Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive exterior Material property
 

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The "fuzz" (well spotted) is from the paper towel I used together with MAF specific sensor spray. Could have used a better (more lint-free) towel. I didn't actually clean the wires which I seem to have overlooked (thanks for bringing that up). I'll reinspect and clean that today.

I did capture some of the fuel trims while I was monitoring/logging O2 sensor data (prior to MAF inspection/cleaning). I just used Torque to capture these data points. I was still exploring which data points to log and I'm not sure about the "O2 sensor1 wide-range Voltage" values, which seem to be scaled. I need to find the other sensors. The service manual states (GD(H6DO)-118) as Malfunction Criteria for the O2 sensors: "Accumulated variation of output voltage of rear oxygen sensor per 32 milliseconds x 4 divided by accumulated variation of lambda of front oxygen (A/F) sensor per 32 milliseconds x 4" which should be less than 9.534. I can't sample at an interval of 32 milliseconds (31.25 samples per second), but it doesn't look like these sensors are bad.

This is after some driving while the vehicle was (more or less) idling for close to 3 minutes.

Rectangle Slope Plot Line Parallel


Should have a longer drive and some more logging later today.
 

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Not sure how to judge the condition of these wires but it doesn't look bad. I sprayed some MAF cleaner on them and removed most if not all of the towel lint (the fuzz).

Automotive lighting Automotive design Eyelash Grey Vehicle door
 

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Recently I've been noticing mini-detonations, seemingly in the exhaust.
2.5 hour drive and I'm still noticing the detonations in the exhaust, which is apparently unspent fuel. No CEL. Perhaps I should have disconnected the battery to reset everything following the MAF cleaning. I should have more log data which I'll be examining. I'll probably follow up in a separate thread, or jump on to the P0420 thread.
 

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That's no good, I wonder how the fuel trims are looking ? I got P0172, P0175 (system too rich) a while after cleaning a failing MAF..
The long term trims seem to be in the 8 to 12% range. I'm not sure if that's good or bad. I'm not getting any other codes than P0420 which I cleared several days ago and hasn't come back since.
Rectangle Slope Font Parallel Plot

Not sure if this even makes any sense, but I added the short and long term for bank 1, and added the short and long term for bank 2. For the same driving stretch:
Slope Rectangle Parallel Font Plot

Also logged MAF, manifold pressure, and coolant and intake temperature sensors. For the same driving stretch:
Rectangle Slope Plot Font Parallel

I'm not seeing anything that would point to something obviously wrong, but I have little to compare with. Also, I thought I had found log settings for all 4 O2 sensors but only 1 showed up in the logs, the other 3 didn't provide log data. There are more O2 related codes/sensors that I have to explore.
 

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you might check the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum line. should be dry.
Ironically, I've been doing just that last week, but it was on my truck, making sure the nipple on the regulator doesn't smell like gas (which it didn't). With 37 psi on the fuel rails at idle, I removed the vacuum line from the regulator which increased psi to 42, which would suggest the regulator is ok. Looks like I'm going to be performing similar tests on the car. For the truck, I have a smoke machine coming in later this week. I'll probably use that for the car as well, notably the exhaust. Currently reading on the effects of the smoke produced by these machines (propylene glycol apparently) on fuel, etc.. Should have paid more attention in chemistry class, but that was before Breaking Bad came out.
 

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Finally getting some snow, just in time for a White Christmas. Looks like it's going to snow in the high country all of next week, so, time to swap the all seasons for snow tires. Never swapped this late in the season.

Put the tires still showing the 8(mm) on the front and the tires where the 8 had faded in the rear. Added some super glue to the axle caps (seems to prevent caps from falling off somewhat), set the pressures to door specs, and torqued the nuts to 81 or whatever my hf torque wrench produces at the 81 setting.
Car Wheel Tire Land vehicle Vehicle


Merry Christmas!
 

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