Subaru Outback Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, long time no posting.

I am sitting at 62k kms on my 2015 Outback 3.6R LTD. I have 18k kms or 17 months left in my extended warranty - then you'll see a bunch of dumb questions from me regarding mods.

Until then - what should i be pushing to get checked out at my next service in 6-8 months? may be the last one with fully warranty coverage. What areas are likely to fail at 81k kms? ;)

Also, best tactics to get a tech to actually go through and pick apart everything that could be warrantied while it's still Subaru's problem?

Thanks all, please move this if it is better suited to elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
2016 2.5i
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
Hi all, long time no posting.

I am sitting at 62k kms on my 2015 Outback 3.6R LTD. I have 18k kms or 17 months left in my extended warranty - then you'll see a bunch of dumb questions from me regarding mods.

Until then - what should i be pushing to get checked out at my next service in 6-8 months? may be the last one with fully warranty coverage. What areas are likely to fail at 81k kms? ;)

Also, best tactics to get a tech to actually go through and pick apart everything that could be warrantied while it's still Subaru's problem?

Thanks all, please move this if it is better suited to elsewhere.
I doubt that you will get a Subaru tech to actually go through the car and pick apart things that could be warrantied.
Let us know how that goes! Are you expecting them to do this for free?
Maybe try an independent (good) mechanic who you pay an hour worth of his time?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
Until then - what should i be pushing to get checked out at my next service in 6-8 months? may be the last one with fully warranty coverage. What areas are likely to fail at 81k kms? ;)
Report to them if there are any changes in the behavior of the transmission, fuel economy, engine performance or smoothness, behavior of the steering, braking, and suspension. Those are the meat and bones that make the car.

Pay attention to the above things for the rest of the duration of your warranty. I shouldn't have to say this, but I will anyways: Do not make up fake problems to send them on a wild goose chase - only legitimate concerns that you may have. Do not be the boy who cried wolf. (not implying that you would, but my words could be misconstrued that way)
 

·
Registered
2020 Outback Touring XT Magnetite Gray Metallic / Java Brown Leather
Joined
·
324 Posts
If you're planning on a new car, I got $390 credit back on my 2015 7/70 warranty toward a new one on my 2020. Of course, I could have just taken the cash.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I doubt that you will get a Subaru tech to actually go through the car and pick apart things that could be warrantied.
Let us know how that goes! Are you expecting them to do this for free?
Maybe try an independent (good) mechanic who you pay an hour worth of his time?
I do know an independent mechanic, which is where i actually got this idea from. He may end up getting the money from me to do the inspection, was just curious if i could get it "straight from the horses mouth", to avoid any conflicts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Report to them if there are any changes in the behavior of the transmission, fuel economy, engine performance or smoothness, behavior of the steering, braking, and suspension. Those are the meat and bones that make the car.

Pay attention to the above things for the rest of the duration of your warranty. I shouldn't have to say this, but I will anyways: Do not make up fake problems to send them on a wild goose chase - only legitimate concerns that you may have. Do not be the boy who cried wolf. (not implying that you would, but my words could be misconstrued that way)
Allow me to clarify - i'm not looking to have parts swapped for the sake of swapping them. I am trying to avoid any large out of pocket expenses within 6 months of the warranty ending on items that are effectively end of life.

I'll keep an eye on the performance of the drivetrain. So far no issues, so just trying to see if there are specifics i should be paying attention to now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
If you're planning on a new car, I got $390 credit back on my 2015 7/70 warranty toward a new one on my 2020. Of course, I could have just taken the cash.
Interesting, i didn't know that was an option. I am planning on keeping the car for a while, although... they have a few remaining 2019s going for reasonable prices...
 

·
Registered
2019 Subaru Outback
Joined
·
300 Posts
Here's an idea, and something you should do all the time, not just when the warranty is about to expire. Drive your car with the sound system off (and your hearing aids in--if necessary) so that you might actually hear something that is starting to go bad. I'm not saying leave the sound off all the time, but do at times have it off when you're just starting out from a cold start, at freeway speeds, etc. That doesn't require a mechanic, removing plugs, etc.
 

·
Registered
2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
Joined
·
2,768 Posts
I don't think there are any typical/predictable failures at or around 50k miles (80k km), you're far more likely to start finding things as you approach 100k miles, IMO (which would have been the only extended warranty I would have considered). I don't know about Canada, but in the US we have additional warranty coverage for various components after the factory warranty expires (60k powertrain, 80k emissions and 100k CVT for MY2015-18). If you scour the forum you'll see that pretty much anything can happen at any time, but I can't imagine most potential problems would be easily detectable unless they're obviously calling attention to themselves. I'm not sure I'd even bother paying someone to spend an hour going over the car at that mileage. As was mentioned, taking it in for noises, or other relatively nit-picky things you pick up on, is the best way to have things documented so you might have some leverage out of warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I have to check my documentation on the various warranties, but i believe you're right. i know the CVT is 10yr/100k, i remember the letter.

I'll spend some time listening over the next few months (especially when the studs come off...), but otherwise i appreciate the time taken to calm my paranoia. I'll save my money for when something does break in the future.

I don't think there are any typical/predictable failures at or around 50k miles (80k km), you're far more likely to start finding things as you approach 100k miles, IMO (which would have been the only extended warranty I would have considered). I don't know about Canada, but in the US we have additional warranty coverage for various components after the factory warranty expires (60k powertrain, 80k emissions and 100k CVT for MY2015-18). If you scour the forum you'll see that pretty much anything can happen at any time, but I can't imagine most potential problems would be easily detectable unless they're obviously calling attention to themselves. I'm not sure I'd even bother paying someone to spend an hour going over the car at that mileage. As was mentioned, taking it in for noises, or other relatively nit-picky things you pick up on, is the best way to have things documented so you might have some leverage out of warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
Allow me to clarify - i'm not looking to have parts swapped for the sake of swapping them. I am trying to avoid any large out of pocket expenses within 6 months of the warranty ending on items that are effectively end of life.

I'll keep an eye on the performance of the drivetrain. So far no issues, so just trying to see if there are specifics i should be paying attention to now.
edit: Your mileage is so low that I rescind the text below:

This is an unpopular opinion around here, but if I were in your shoes I would pay out-of-pocket to have the CVT fluid changed (by the dealer) a month before the warranty expires. That way you have time to discover if there's a problem with the transmission after the fluid change (and warranty will cover it) and if there's no problem, at least you have fresh CVT fluid. It may cost hundreds of dollars to pay for the fluid change, so don't know if you consider this a cost savings, but a new transmission is much more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,175 Posts
edit: Your mileage is so low that I rescind the text below:

This is an unpopular opinion around here, but if I were in your shoes I would pay out-of-pocket to have the CVT fluid changed (by the dealer) a month before the warranty expires. That way you have time to discover if there's a problem with the transmission after the fluid change (and warranty will cover it) and if there's no problem, at least you have fresh CVT fluid. It may cost hundreds of dollars to pay for the fluid change, so don't know if you consider this a cost savings, but a new transmission is much more.
maybe even a few months earlier than that if you're worried about wear to have time to get an oil sample to send off for analysis.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top