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Discussion Starter #1
My car is at the end of it's life, so I'm looking towards a used outback. Is there any particular year, engine, or generation I should avoid due to mechanical issues. Thanks.
 

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as a very general statement, i'd shop 2016 or newer.

more details about you budget might help.

with used cars, it's previous care and present condition become more important than make/model as they get older. So, shop carefully.

be aware, leases for used cars are becoming more common too.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
as a very general statement, i'd shop 2016 or newer.

more details about you budget might help.

with used cars, it's previous care and present condition become more important than make/model as they get older. So, shop carefully.

be aware, leases for used cars are becoming more common too.
Appreciate the reply. I'm researching the inherent flaws of the vehicle, so I know if there's a need to avoid certain years, altogether, regardless of upkeep, etc. I fully understand that upkeep and records of such are importing info when buying a used car. Not looking for advice about how to buy used.
 

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You still haven't given enough data for a useful response. A 1997 Outback has different issues, quirks, and flaws than a 2019.

What is you budget?
What do you need in a vehicle?
Will you be doing your own repairs or will it be taken to a shop for any service and repair?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You could probably get a used 2019 at this point.

What budget are you looking at?
My budget has no bearing on any inherent issues with certain models or year vehicle. I want to know if there are any specfic years, models, engines, transmissions, etc to avoid because they are junk.
 

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subaru has been making cars for a long time, to list weaknesses for the entire timeline is impossible. Easier to mention a generation, then ask what common problems it has.

can you tell us a generation or model year to start from? are you considering models old enough to have timing belts? Are you considering a turbocharged model?
 

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If you want us to list every specific issue for every single model of a vehicle platform that came out in 1995...how about no?

Answer our questions and we can answer yours. Keep asking hypoteticals and you'll keep getting non answers.
 

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My car is at the end of it's life, so I'm looking towards a used outback. Is there any particular year, engine, or generation I should avoid due to mechanical issues. Thanks.
Here's a general answer. If you want to limit your budget to $5,000 or less, you might find a 1st or 2nd gen vintage with no rust thats been parked in a garage....owned by a little old lady from Pasadena.... if your fortunate.
Sooner or later you'll need to lay down a lot of $ for a new head gasket job, or 2nd hand engine. I don't know if or when the engineers corrected that issue with the 2.5.
That will ruin your day.

It comez down to what they said IMHO. Sounds like you need a reliable lower cost OB.
Do you just want something to get you from point A to B until you can afford a newer car? No shame in that. Just need more info. Perhaps start with a price range.
 

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My budget has no bearing on any inherent issues with certain models or year vehicle. I want to know if there are any specfic years, models, engines, transmissions, etc to avoid because they are junk.
Appreciate the reply. I'm researching the inherent flaws of the vehicle, so I know if there's a need to avoid certain years, altogether, regardless of upkeep, etc. I fully understand that upkeep and records of such are importing info when buying a used car. Not looking for advice about how to buy used.
I’d avoid buying a 2005-9 2.5XT as these turbo engines are likely the least reliable from a used car standpoint.

Otherwise most years are quite reliable to a point. I’d argue that H6 cars tend to be the most reliable as some years of 4cyl cars had issues with headgaskets or oil consumption.
 

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Definite NO on the XT cars. My Subaru mechanic son says the best one to pick is 2010-2014 outback as it still has the 4EAT and not the CVT and the timing belt is way easy to change. The FB engines have had issues with oil consumption. Try and get one from a non rust area it will be worth the few extra $$
 

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My budget has no bearing on any inherent issues with certain models or year vehicle. I want to know if there are any specfic years, models, engines, transmissions, etc to avoid because they are junk.
I should have gone back and read all of your posts.

In that case, what they said. +1
 

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2010 to 2014 3.6 5AE......reliable older tech
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the great intel. I found an earlier thread in Gen3 that I started awhile ago that also has good info.
I test drove a 2007 manual yesterday. not sure which engine it had. airbag light was on and the "owner" smelled of a used car salesman. Car looked and smelled overly nice. Seemed underpowered. I walked.
 

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Definite NO on the XT cars. My Subaru mechanic son says the best one to pick is 2010-2014 outback as it still has the 4EAT and not the CVT and the timing belt is way easy to change. The FB engines have had issues with oil consumption. Try and get one from a non rust area it will be worth the few extra $$
No on XT cars for sure.

But you should double check with your mechanic. 2010-2014 Outbacks have a CVT.

2013-2014 Outback's have an FB25. I would take it over an EJ253 that's in the 2010-2012 models.

Oil consumption issues are easier to deal with than head gaskets that are basically guaranteed to fail.

Pretty much every NA EJ25 including the 25D, 251, and 253 has it happen at some point.

That's before we get to the expensive timing belt jobs.

I think putting oil in occasionally is a better option (which isn't even a guaranteed thing) than it is not have to deal with head gaskets, timing belts, while getting better fuel economy and less emissions?

I guess drive train wise, any 6 cylinder is solid. The 01-04 has rust issues but pretty much any 05-19 H6 (EZ30R or EZ36) should have a great track record in reliability.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Not sure if you're being sarcastic or not. I've been around the sun many times and bought a few used cars. I like to think I know when someone isn't being honest.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
No on XT cars for sure.

But you should double check with your mechanic. 2010-2014 Outbacks have a CVT.

2013-2014 Outback's have an FB25. I would take it over an EJ253 that's in the 2010-2012 models.

Oil consumption issues are easier to deal with than head gaskets that are basically guaranteed to fail.

Pretty much every NA EJ25 including the 25D, 251, and 253 has it happen at some point.

That's before we get to the expensive timing belt jobs.

I think putting oil in occasionally is a better option (which isn't even a guaranteed thing) than it is not have to deal with head gaskets, timing belts, while getting better fuel economy and less emissions?

I guess drive train wise, any 6 cylinder is solid. The 01-04 has rust issues but pretty much any 05-19 H6 (EZ30R or EZ36) should have a great track record in reliability.
Thanks for the info. Lots of numbers that I'll be researching.
 
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