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Registered
2000 Outback 2.5L
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61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've had my 2000 OB for just a week now. I'm busy getting all the bugs fixed and have been exploring the car. I was looking at all the wiring under the steering wheel and came across a green connector that was disconnected.

I plugged it in, turned the ignition on and everything is normal, except the Check Engine Light (CEL) is flashing. So then I start the car and the CEL remains flashing and the car runs ruf, :eek: , turn off the car and disconnect the green connector. Try it again with it disconnected and everything runs fine as it did before.

Any ideas? Picture below. I'm going to ask the Subura Dealer about this on Monday when I take it in to have Recall #WWM961 Rear suspension sub-frame corrosion and #WXW801 Fornt oxygen (A/F ratio) sensor taken care of. My independent mechanic didn't pick up on it when he was looking the car over.



Thanks guys & gals
 

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Tokyo's between my toes
2001 Wintergreen Outback 5MT
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6,684 Posts
You are very lucky, those green connectors are part of the Subaru Self-Destruct System intended to eliminate curious people who mess around with unplugged connectors. If you had left them connected, your car would have exploded.

Yes ... right ...

Another possibility is that you pretty much stumbled onto the answer yourself. Those are test connectors which make your Check Engine Light flash a coded signal to indicate any error code stored in the ECU. I searched Google a bit and found a page with this text:





Until the advent of OBD II, Subaru self-diagnostics were different from anybody else's. There were four modes: U-Check, D-Check, Read Memory, and Clear Memory.

The U(for User)-Check is simply what turns on the Check Engine light when any EFI components necessary for basic starting and driving functions are found wanting. The D(for Dealer)-Check is the most useful -- it's where you'll find codes for the whole engine management system.

To enter this mode, get the engine up to normal operating temperature, shut if off, connect the two green test plugs (under the dash by the steering column, or on the engine side of the firewall by the master cylinder), turn on the ignition, and watch the Check Engine light (on pre-1990 models, look at the O2 monitor lamp, which is visible through a hole in the MPFI control box under the steering column).

If a fault is currently present, a code will be flashed out. Read it as follows: Each long flash (1.2 seconds) represents ten, and each short flash (0.2 second) one. So, Code 23 would appear as two long flashes, then three short flashes. After a pause of 1.8 seconds, the message is repeated.
 

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Lord of ScoobyMods, ,
19' Impreza Sport 5 dr / 01' Forester S / 13' OB CVT / 10' Legacy 3.6R / 99 Mita MX-5
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1,213 Posts
Plugging it in will put the car in diagnostic mode and all sorts of relays and fans will come on. It's not connected for normal driving.
 

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Registered
2000 Outback 2.5L
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61 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Cool, so I'll plug that green connector together when my wife drives the car. Thanks guys! :D
 
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