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Also a note. Not many on here have lowered Outbacks but for those who do or have thought about it Whiteline has another endlink that will work out better that they will put in the package in place if you ask.
 

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2020 Onyx
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Discussion Starter · #202 ·
Is it the KLC231?
 

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Discussion Starter · #204 ·
Ok - same as the adjustable KLC200 that I installed but shorter - thanks!
 
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those would possibly work id have to put the legacy suspension and remeasure everything again because i forgot to write it down.... 😅
 

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Discussion Starter · #208 ·
@RocketMan20 I used my 10" high Race Ramps but you can do it with 6" Rhino Ramps or whatever. The funny thing is that when installing the Perrin Steering Lockdown if you try using high ramps it's hard to reach the clamp from lying on the ground so I had to use my lower ramps. For the RSB any ramp makes it easier.

@Exordium01 asked in the group buy thread what difference the end-link makes - first look at this response Whiteline solid 20mm rear sway bar test fitment for...

To more directly address the question - functionally as far as ride quality, ability to control sway, I did not notice any improvement switching from the OE end-link that was at an angle, to the more straight Whiteline end-link with the golden spacers. I wanted to make a post talking about the different angles and how it might affect the sway bar's spring rate, articulation, etc. but it was too complicated for me.

As mentioned before, if the end-link is slightly canted towards the front of the car in the neutral position, any movement of the wheel up or down, which twists the sway bar, will pull the end-link towards the back of the car into a more neutral position before eventually being pulled to tilt backwards at maximum travel. What I haven't mentioned before is that in theory this makes a forward-canting end-link perhaps giving slightly more range of motion than one that starts out vertical and then ends up being pulled back. If you do get the Whiteline end-links, you can experiment by moving the end-link forward or back using the spacers to determine what works best for you. If someone else can comment on the geometry difference and how it would affect the sway bar it would be much appreciated.
 

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@RocketMan20 I used my 10" high Race Ramps but you can do it with 6" Rhino Ramps or whatever. The funny thing is that when installing the Perrin Steering Lockdown if you try using high ramps it's hard to reach the clamp from lying on the ground so I had to use my lower ramps. For the RSB any ramp makes it easier.

@Exordium01 asked in the group buy thread what difference the end-link makes - first look at this response Whiteline solid 20mm rear sway bar test fitment for...

To more directly address the question - functionally as far as ride quality, ability to control sway, I did not notice any improvement switching from the OE end-link that was at an angle, to the more straight Whiteline end-link with the golden spacers. I wanted to make a post talking about the different angles and how it might affect the sway bar's spring rate, articulation, etc. but it was too complicated for me.

As mentioned before, if the end-link is slightly canted towards the front of the car in the neutral position, any movement of the wheel up or down, which twists the sway bar, will pull the end-link towards the back of the car into a more neutral position before eventually being pulled to tilt backwards at maximum travel. What I haven't mentioned before is that in theory this makes a forward-canting end-link perhaps giving slightly more range of motion than one that starts out vertical and then ends up being pulled back. If you do get the Whiteline end-links, you can experiment by moving the end-link forward or back using the spacers to determine what works best for you. If someone else can comment on the geometry difference and how it would affect the sway bar it would be much appreciated.
I haven't seen the OEM end links off the car so don't know the answer to this. But is it possible to modify the OEM links by removing one side of the sleeve the bolt goes through inside the control arm so the link will be able to locate forward in the arm and straighten it's angle? Then use the cut off portion of the sleeve or some other spacer on the back side to positively locate the link, ie; take up space.
I don't really like the angle of the OEM link in the soft hole but the WL link seems like a lot of cost and material to simply relocate the bottom of the link better geometry.
 

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I haven't seen the OEM end links off the car so don't know the answer to this. But is it possible to modify the OEM links by removing one side of the sleeve the bolt goes through inside the control arm so the link will be able to locate forward in the arm and straighten it's angle? Then use the cut off portion of the sleeve or some other spacer on the back side to positively locate the link, ie; take up space.
I don't really like the angle of the OEM link in the soft hole but the WL link seems like a lot of cost and material to simply relocate the bottom of the link better geometry.
Attached is a picture of a stock end link.

Would it be possible to use a hack saw/band saw to cut off one side and move it to the other? I suppose. However, I'd classify this approach as;

Category: Anything Is Possible
Subcategory: Kluge. :)
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Attached is a picture of a stock end link.

Would it be possible to use a hack saw/band saw to cut off one side and move it to the other? I suppose. However, I'd classify this approach as;

Category: Anything Is Possible
Subcategory: Kluge. :)
View attachment 524648
Thanks for that picture. It appears the idea should work perfectly. The hack saw is the better idea because it won't generate enough heat to compromise the rubber bushing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #214 ·
I examined the OE endlink and just in case someone reading this thread thinks it's a good idea to use a hacksaw - image below.

The rubber bushing is fully adhered to the metal sleeve in the bottom bushing for the lower control arm, and it's tapered all the way to the end.

As for the expense, during the group buy it will be cheaper - Whiteline said it will be discounted, but how much I don't know. If you use the stock endlink it will work - the only question is how long and I don't have that answer, but in my mind it will eventually fail. If it does fail, it won't be catastrophic - you'll get a rattle or something and you can decide to live with a rattle or eventually get some other end-link. The bar will not fall off. The reason I didn't initially detect the angle issue is that I installed the sway bar end-links first, and then pushed the sway bar up and put the clamps on. I did notice that the bar was pushing itself against the surface that I was mounting it to, but it just didn't register that I was pushing the end-links so far over. Later on when I went back under the car to take a look I noticed the angle.

Price wise it may approximate buying the bar at retail and getting the endlinks free? I don't know. My bias is to do things "right" the first time and not have to worry that my half-measures were good enough, but this situation does not quite rise to "penny wise pound foolish" - there will be no damage to the car or sudden change in handling that would be dangerous if the end-link bushing tears. You do have a couple weeks to decide and if you don't get the endlinks now they'll still be available at retail if you eventually need them.

Some people have had stock end-links fail from bending (not gen 6) when using stiff rear sway bars, so getting a stronger end-link is still a good idea even if it were not for the angle issue.
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@SilverOnyx is correct. On the factory endlinks the metal tube is bonded to the rubber bushing. There is no way to cut the tube and still have it function correctly. On the Whiteline endlinks, the tubes are separate from the poly bushing which allows you to offset the link in the control arm channel to effectively use both adjustment holes. KLC200 is the proper endlink for standard Outbacks. If you are lowered from factory ride height, either option KLC182 or KLC231 will work. It just is a personal preference if you prefer the bushing to bushing type end links or the more traditional style bushing to ball joint type.
 

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Ooo, now those pics paint a different picture, thanks for posting those. I would not want to cut that part and initially I didn't know the rubber went all the way to the ends of the link. Couldn't tell from the first pic.
Whiteline, PM incoming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #217 ·
I wasn't sure if you were being serious about saying the hacksaw was a good idea that's why I posted those pics. Even the Mevotech end-links are constructed the same way and can't be modified.

 

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Just got an email from Whiteline with purchase instructions, end links are $100 when you use there discount code.

However if you are a veteran or active military you will get 10% off the entire order, which is $10 more off than with the end link code. Just have to fill out the form that pops up for GovX

Just a heads up
 

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I've had 19 & 20mm STI bars on 3 Subies using OEM end links. Nary a problem. That said, I take corners a bit faster than "average" but am not beating them up & haven't keep any of those cars from more than 5 years.
Given my past experience and driving style, I don't feel the "need" to spend more safely and reliably get the suspension improvement I seek.
If I were really pushing my suspension regularly or keeping the car for 100K or more, I'd pony up for WL endlinks.
Really depends on one's "needs", how long one plans to keep the car and ones driving habits (and bank account!). YMMV
 
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Discussion Starter · #220 ·
The issue is that the whiteline sway bar is longer than the interchangeable OE sway bars in previous gen vehicles. If you use the hard setting the stock end-link might be fine but if you want to use the soft setting it's being pushed out of alignment. In the soft setting it roughly straddles the stiffness of a 19mm solid and 20mm solid bar. In the hard setting it's probably more like a 21mm bar and felt too stiff for my liking but YMMV.

A sway bar only changes effective lateral spring rates, but the relationship between shock damping and spring rates is important. In the hard setting, the lateral spring rate was insufficiently damped is my impression. With stiffer shocks it might be fine in the hard setting but in the soft setting it's well poised and controlled.
 
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