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Discussion Starter #1
So the rear trailing arm bushings on my '05 Legacy are shot. I'm thinking of going with the Whiteline kit simply due to ease of installation and the fact that they're half the price of OEM bushings. My question is what will be the effect on ride quality. I live in NYC where the roads are pretty terrible so NVH is a pretty important consideration.
 

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I don't think you'll notice much of a difference by just replacing those. I replaced every single rear bushing with poly and all the rear arms have solid pillow balls. I wouldn't say that noise and vibration increased much even with all that, but I drove a car with stiff coilovers for 10 years that other people couldn't stand riding in. It didn't bother me at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Just installed them. Yeah you're right. Not much of a difference. Noticed that the inner bushings for my rear lateral links are kind of shot so I might be doing those too.
 

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Those wont affect NVH, and actually upgrading them are better for your alignment as well as rear is limited by the stock set up. When you upgrade your LCA bushings you will get more NVH, same as on coilovers.

I had the PSRS bushings on my LCAs and coilovers and holy **** did i need a mouth guard every time i hit a bump. Cornering was great, bumps and potholes not so much.
 

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Just installed them. Yeah you're right. Not much of a difference. Noticed that the inner bushings for my rear lateral links are kind of shot so I might be doing those too.
How did you install them? I have some sitting here from my suspension rebuild, but I didn't get to doing the trailing arms in that, as everything else took too long.
 

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How did you install them? I have some sitting here from my suspension rebuild, but I didn't get to doing the trailing arms in that, as everything else took too long.
I torched the rubber, cut the sleeve with a recip saw and diablo carbide blade, then hammered the sleeve out. The carbide blade isn't a necessity, but man that thing cut through it like butter.
 

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I installed those bushings recently on a 2005 Outback with 230K miles and did not notice any difference in the ride. I had replaced all the other rear bushings before tackling those. The large front bushings on the trailing arm have openings and I used a reciprocating saw to cut slits in the solid portions to remove the center of the bushing. It's necessary to slowly plunge cut the blade into the rubber until it's through to the inside. I then used the reciprocating saw to cut through the shells and then punched them out. I wanted to avoid any open flame anywhere near the gas tank and brakelines.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
How did you install them? I have some sitting here from my suspension rebuild, but I didn't get to doing the trailing arms in that, as everything else took too long.
Removed the subframe connector from the trailing arm bracket, unbolted the bracket from the body, and then unbolted the shock. Also don't forget to remove the 2 12mm bolts holding the brake lines/abs sensors to the trailing arm. The whole thing is pretty movable at that point. Pry the trailing arm down with a long prybar (I pried against the fuel tank. This is fine, it dosen't take much pressure to move it) so that the bushing is accessible under the car. Remove the trailing arm bracket (this was fun).

I didn't use a torch. Instead I used spade bits (like these) and drilled out as much of the rubber as I needed to until I could just push the bushing out. It was fast and easy, and no risk of setting the car on fire. Then I used a sawzall to make a cut in the outer sleeve and then it chiseled out pretty easily. The whiteline bushings I pressed in by hand (use grease here), but getting the bracket to fit back on was a little bit of a struggle. The bushings are pretty fat. After that it installation was reverse of disassembly although I recommend reinstalling the shock bolt first because it's a royal PITA to get back in once the trailing arm is bolted back up. The job overall was kinda hard and I wouldn't recommend trying it without an impact gun. Some of the bolts are really tight and there's very little room for a breaker bar down there.

I took some pics, which may or may not be terribly helpful.





 

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Thanks,

I've replaced all the lateral links recently, so I've got some idea of how the bolts are. This is a New England car, so the rust is pretty bad (had to replace the steering knuckles and wheel bearings at the front because I couldn't get the ball joints out, or the wheel bearings off the knuckles...). I think the front trailing arm mount is OK though.

I did try and replace the bushings in the upper lateral arm with the push out the middle and sawzall the outer shell technique. I can't move the outer shell even after I cut it in two places, but I haven't tried that hard yet. This is making me nervous of trying to do the trailing arms on the car. I'm going to try harder with that to get the technique down (I replaced the upper arms with new OEM ones to avoid the issue and get the car reassembled) before I try the trailing arms.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The only ones might give you trouble is the bolt securing the subframe connector to the trailing arm bracket since it’s exposed to the elements on the other side and the nut/bolt for the bushing itself. The bolts securing the bracket to the body will probably come out easily since there’s no way for salt/water to get in there. Mine came out super easy and the threads looked like new and were clean.
 
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