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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm just curious what brought people to a Subaru.

We live on a private unpaved gravel road that's just under a half mile long. There is about a 200' elevation difference between the beginning of the road and where my house is located, so driving home is mostly up hill. This is Maine and we do get quite a bit of snow and ice. We owned a 2015 Hyundai Sonata that we purchased new before we knew we would be making a move here and we kept it through last winter but we quickly knew it wasn't going to work out. We purchased a good set of studded snow tires and I made sure when I plowed the road that I scraped as far down as I could so the car would have enough traction to make it up and down the road. Still there were many times where the road was just too much for the Hyundai to handle so it stayed put in the garage or at the bottom of the road if it couldn't make it back up after a storm.

We decided this spring to begin researching a good alternative and we knew that all wheel drive was the best way to go. We spent hours on the computer reading reviews from the experts and from everyday folks on many different makes and model cars and SUV's. Obviously the Subaru Outback won us over as I am here posting this. We needed a capable vehicle and reliability and value were high on our list. With the Subaru you get a lot of features for your money and they hold their value well. I searched auto trader for used Subaru's and there are many for sale with well over 100,00 miles and they are selling for more than other brands with similar miles. Ground clearance was another nice feature with the Outback compared to many SUV's. The question we found ourselves asking was; If you are looking for an all wheel drive with SUV capability for less than 40K what other options are there? The answer we came to was none. So, the Subaru was it.
 

Master Caster
馃枻馃挃馃挋 3 Beautiful OBXTs
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In 1989 I bought my 1st Subaru. It was an '87 2 door XT sedan with air suspension and a turbo. I had 2 other turbo station wagons (Loyal body style) amd a couple NA wagons.

Then, after 20 years in construction, I am back to the brand...for the last 4 years now. What brough me back? The 5 door XT Wagon. Where else can you get an AWD turbo station wagon...Well, ...NOT Subaru, unless you count the Levorg, which the USDM doesn't get. The 2005-2009 Turbo wagons are what brought me back to Subaru.

If I were buying a new car, it would be another turbo station wagon. Unfortunately it would not be a Subaru. It would be an Audi, a Volvo, a sexy new Jaguar, VW alltrack or the Buick Sportback. Yes, even Buick sees the benefit of a hot sexy 5-door sled.

Anyway...Turbo Station Wagons are what brought me to Subaru and will likely be the reason I leave.
 

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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
In 1989 I bought my 1st Subaru. It was an '87 2 door XT sedan with air suspension and a turbo. I had 2 other turbo station wagons (Loyal body style) amd a couple NA wagons.

Then, after 20 years in construction, I am back to the brand...for the last 4 years now. What brough me back? The 5 door XT Wagon. Where else can you get an AWD turbo station wagon...Well, ...NOT Subaru, unless you count the Levorg, which the USDM doesn't get. The 2005-2009 Turbo wagons are what brought me back to Subaru.

If I were buying a new car, it would be another turbo station wagon. Unfortunately it would not be a Subaru. It would be an Audi, a Volvo, a sexy new Jaguar, VW alltrack or the Buick Sportback. Yes, even Buick sees the benefit of a hot sexy 5-door sled.

Anyway...Turbo Station Wagons are what brought me to Subaru and will likely be the reason I leave.

The Audi A4 Quattro wagon is an attractive car but was more expensive, lacked the interior room and ground clearance of the Outback. The price was higher too. We stayed away from researching the more expensive premium brands because they would just end up getting beat up on our road and they were out of our price range, but I can appreciate and understand your attraction to turbo. maybe we'll see another turbo Subaru at some point? A turbo charged 3.6 would be a lot of fun I think.
 

Master Caster
馃枻馃挃馃挋 3 Beautiful OBXTs
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Like I said, 4 years ago I bought a 2006, last year another 2005. Those cars are not the same size as a current OB. One thing I like about them.

And there is a reason I am buying 10 year old cars. A $38K or more OB is very expensive if you ask me. So a $60K German or Swedish wagon is about the same if you ask me.

I am just whining because I am morning the loss of the high performance wagon that Subaru used to make...
 

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2015 Outback 2.5i Limited, Ice Silver/Black
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2,452 Posts
Cheap(er), AWD, 4 cyl, cubic yards of space. Poor-man's Allroad.
It's my first and being retired I don't drive too much. But so far, so good... I paid about $27K out the door while trading in 2 cars with 400K miles and 25 car-years between them.

PS - And it didn't look like a gym shoe...
 
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2016 2.5i Ltd Outback (Tungsten)
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835 Posts
Our first Subaru was in the late 80s and the reason was we wanted a wagon and the price /value was much better than Toyota (we were comparing to a Camry wagon). We are on our 6th one now and the reasons we keep getting them are pretty much the same - better value for the money vs competition (our last comparison was to a Honda CRV).

We like them!
 

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2016 Limited 3.6R
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298 Posts
I always knew Subarus were great although I had no personal experience with them. I saw my 2007 Forester Columbia Edition on the front grass of the dealership on my way to Thanksgiving dinner with my father. Wow I thought with it's metallic blue paint and gray body cladding.. the car looked great. Later that week I remembered seeing it and had some free time to burn so I went back 'just to look' and bought it on the spot.

Been driving it (and loving it) ever since. Although I did join OB forums to inquire about replacing it with a 2016/2017 OB.
 

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(formerly) 03 H6 OBW , (presently) 06 WRX Sportwagon & 2021 Honda CR-V
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^^^ that car still looks nice.
 

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2014 Outback 3.6R Limited w/Navigation & SAP
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68 Posts
I just wanted something I could haul five adults and their luggage in, that I could afford. Virtually every other car I checked was either too small, or had no padding in the middle of the back seat. The choices basically came down to a Mercedes E320 wagon (none available in my area when I was ready to buy), a Porsche Cayenne (didn't tick the "affordable" box) or the Outback. I've really been enjoying the Outback (so much so that when my first one got totaled two months after I bought it, I found another one just like it to replace it). I'm hoping we get some snow this winter, I want to see how much better the Outback is than the A4 it replaced.
 

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2005 Outback 2.5i 4 inch ADF lift 215/70/16 BFG's Sparco Wheels
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87 Posts
I go to the Snow a lot. I also need a vehicle I can sleep inside . That led to buy a 97 Legacy wagon. I also owned a 2003 GMC K1500 at the time. I put 200K on the GMC without any issues.
I bought the Subie used with 135K on it.
I liked being in the GMC better. More room, more ground clearance, more power etc.. The main reason was the ground clearance . So.........I lifted the Subie. It was fun, but just didn't have the room inside for all the needed gear and to comfortably sleep in.
So, it would come down to the weather as to which car I would take to the mountains. If it was going to be a mild weather weekend I would consider the Subie. But I still took the truck most of the time.
I traded in the GMC at 200K for a 2014 Chevy SilveradoK1500. Same basic truck, same options.
I recently sold the Subie with 255K on it.


I FOUND THE GM PRODUCT MUCH MORE RELIABLE


In other words the Subie would always have something small go out and needed to be repaired
Some were small repairs, some were large


Now, some of it was just confidence in reliability that may have come from owning the Truck from it being New. But where I park would be a nightmare if the car doesn't start ( Long Trudge out in snow and steep terrain)

I do still love my subies, but when asked about both I say- either will go 200K, but the Subie needs more help getting there.


I do still own a 2005 Outback and Im waiting for a lift . For me, the Subie is the project, fun car. But If I need to get WAAAAAY out there, and its going to be crappy weather wise, the Chevy gets the nod. Hands down
 

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2018 Outaback 2.5i Limited with eyesight.
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90 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I go to the Snow a lot. I also need a vehicle I can sleep inside . That led to buy a 97 Legacy wagon. I also owned a 2003 GMC K1500 at the time. I put 200K on the GMC without any issues.
I bought the Subie used with 135K on it.
I liked being in the GMC better. More room, more ground clearance, more power etc.. The main reason was the ground clearance . So.........I lifted the Subie. It was fun, but just didn't have the room inside for all the needed gear and to comfortably sleep in.
So, it would come down to the weather as to which car I would take to the mountains. If it was going to be a mild weather weekend I would consider the Subie. But I still took the truck most of the time.
I traded in the GMC at 200K for a 2014 Chevy SilveradoK1500. Same basic truck, same options.
I recently sold the Subie with 255K on it.


I FOUND THE GM PRODUCT MUCH MORE RELIABLE


I do still love my subies, but when asked about both I say- either will go 200K, but the Subie needs more help getting there.


I do still own a 2005 Outback and Im waiting for a lift . For me, the Subie is the project, fun car. But If I need to get WAAAAAY out there, and its going to be crappy weather wise, the Chevy gets the nod. Hands down
My truck which I also use as a plow truck is a 2014 Silverado 2500 HD. I love my truck and the thing can go anywhere. The only problem is that is costs a lot of gas money to go anywhere in it. I'm surprised that the you find the Chevy more reliable. So far no problems with my truck and the car we just picked up a few days ago. It will be fun to see which one requires the least amount of maintenance over the years and we plan on keeping both for a very long time.
 

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2005 Outback 2.5i 4 inch ADF lift 215/70/16 BFG's Sparco Wheels
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87 Posts
I'm surprised that the you find the Chevy more reliable. So far no problems with my truck and the car we just picked up a few days ago. It will be fun to see which one requires the least amount of maintenance over the years and we plan on keeping both for a very long time.

Im also surprised ! I only state my experience if people ask me about which one I like best. As you say the Silverado likes fuel. But Mine is a 1500 so it does do a bit better than yours, but I would love a 2500HD, just no need for that much power.


Don't get me wrong, the Subaru is great. I just like a lot of room.
Now, If I had a Newer outback, say 2015 or newer I may have more confidence in it and it could become the goto car.
But I have yet to take the 05 up to the "stomping grounds" ( Mammoth Lakes, Eastern Sierra Nevada)
Its ready, just don't go up there much in Summer
 

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2017 outback premium w/ eyesight, 2.5L H4, crystal white pearl / black cloth interior
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18 Posts
After a very bad ownership experience with a domestic made car (even though the truck made by the same manufacturer I own is very reliable) and not liking the product offerings from the other two domestic manufacturers, I decided to go import.

In fact, the way the big 3 pushes pickups and SUV's, I really believe that the Big 3 has given up on the car business and focus their efforts on pickups and SUVs in reference to quality, pricing, durability, etc.

Around here, Honda and Toyota is so popular and sells so many cars that the dealers are basically non-negotionable. They have developed the arrogant and crass attitudes the American new car dealers have. Basically, they are so popular where the new car is sticker price firm and you have to basically negotiate the best price on the trade in you can get (and people fall for it). In fact the Toyota dealer bragged about being owned by one of the NASCAR racing team owners to the point of you should be privileged to pay extra for the brand name cache of that NASCAR team and their driver. I kid you not.

Mitsubishi to me is garbage. Nissan is owned by a different NASCAR racing team owner and nothing there attracted me.

Went to Mazda and drove a Mazda 3 Hatchback, liked the car but didn't like the deal and thought I could do better (I did)

Went to VW and drove the Jetta Sportwagen, made me very claustrophic inside and alot smaller inside the drivers area than I thought. Salesman steered me to a Passat wagon or a Tiguan that pricewise, put me into BMW 1,3 / Mercedes C territory. In addition, even though I drove a gas model Jetta Sportwagen with the tamer version of the Audi 5 cylinder, Dieselgate has really affected resale value of VW across the board and many dealers are refusing trades for all VWs. The dealer at that time has since sold the VW dealership to one of the regional dealership network groups with dealerships throughout the NC-SC-VA area. They are pretty much untouchable where nobody wants them (except Subaru dealers since JD power research says the majority of VW dieselgate owners who took the buyout went to Subaru) and resale has tanked no matter what model you have.

Went to BMW and drove the X1, didn't like the required dealer maintenance and their ripoff charges since i change my oil and my filters, etc. just to maintain my warranty.

Went to look at a Volvo V40 and for the price and the bragging of luxury, it didn't look or feel luxurious at all on the outside or inside. Was rather plain looking to me outside and inside for the price. To me, the Mazda looked more luxurious with a cheaper cost.

Flustered, I went to the pet store nearby to pick up pet food for my dog and saw a Crosstrek. Impressed with the styling with curves for a Subaru.

Researched Subaru for a couple of weeks and decided to test drive a Crosstrek (wanted fuel economy since I traveled quite a bit for work). There was negotiations back and forth but it was calm, diplomatic and cordial, very professional and businesslike. I bought the Crosstrek.

2 1/2 years later, old job shut down and moved halfway across the country, new job is behind the desk where support is more phone based, but when I do go on the road, I now have to carry the toolkit, repair parts (didn't have to before since the toolkit and repair parts went FedEx to the hotel and when done back to the office via FedEx), and my luggage. The Crosstrek became both very cramped and very anemic to where I was having to use the paddle shifters to rev the engine to provide power to move the car. But the car was solidly built and the only thing that failed when I had it for 2 1/2 years was the backup camera. I needed more power and room with the cargo versatility. Decided to get the Outback, had the same calm, diplomatic, cordial, professional and businesslike experience and traded the Crosstrek for the Outback.
 

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2017 OB Limited 3.6
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114 Posts
I previously had an 86 Subaru DL. It was no frills, only an air conditioner (live in the South) and was all that I could afford - I got $250 for trading in a 1973 Celica with 300,000+ miles, zero down. 3 year balloon payment at the end. Got 160,000 miles out of the Subaru. The timing belt broke like clock work at 50,000 so I replaced that two more times. The front boots seemed to wear out every 30,000 and I had some valve issues but overall a good car. The last 2 winters I've been iced in for a couple of 2 - 3 day stretches at a time. My Prius wouldn't even think about getting out of the garage and same for the Camry. I swore that would never happen again. My sister loves her OB; she takes a few 2,500 mile trips a year visiting her kids. I had a co-worker that loves his. I was impressed with the safety features so made the purchase. Like everything so far. Looking forward to not being homebound during the next ice storm.
 

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Honda owner shopping for a 2018 Outback but holding off due to head unit issues
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90 Posts
I don't own a Subaru (yet!).

But everyone I talk to who owns a Subaru -- neighbors, coworkers, and even the tree service guy -- raves about their Subies. To me that really says something about the brand and the car.
 

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Outbrat XT, Foz, 3.0R Limited
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4,637 Posts
Because 30 years ago my brother had a GL hatch. He drove the crap out of it and I had so much fun in it. And because I grew up driving rear wheel drive and working on transversely mounted engines sucks.
 

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Silver: 2009 Subaru Outback Limited Edition, 2.5 Liter EJ25, Automatic. Gem: 2002 Subaru Outback LL Bean Edition, 3.0 liter EZ30D, Automatic
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207 Posts
Because I probably take after my grandmother, she always had big, boat-like station wagons and I loved those cars. They don't make cars like that anymore.

Flash forward to modern times, I was raised on Toyotas (Corollas, specifically) but always admired the Subaru Outbacks.
When I finally was able to obtain a car of my own choosing, I went with a 2002 LL Bean Outback, already 10 years old with 111,000 miles on it.
I liked the all wheel drive feature, and the safety reputation. When I test drove my first 4 cyl Outback, I was impressed by the way it handled. I'd always thought Toyotas were nice and tight, but after driving a Subaru, Toyotas felt like go-carts.
I researched the Outbacks a lot before settling on one. Briefly considered the Forester, but when I found out it didn't offer any more cargo space for the bigger, boxier design, it was ruled out.
I went with the H6 for the timing chain and extra power. It was great to finally have something that could do some towing. So I put a tow hitch on. (Found out one had been there before).

As far as maintenance and repair, the Subaru is similar to the Toyota. Both needed head gaskets at similar age and mileage. Both about equal in terms of maintenance. I consider both "good Asian cars", but the Subaru is just so much more fun to drive.

An additional feature I've come to know about Subaru, that I didn't realize when I bought the car, is that it's actually a good car for someone who is a beginner and wants to learn about mechanics, because of the supportive community around it. I find many videos on youtube about common repairs and maintenance that help a lot, plus websites such as this forum. There's even Subaru conventions and stuff, which I hope someday I can check out. I didn't know what I was getting into when I got a Subaru, but I'm glad I did.
 

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06 3.0R JDM facelift SI Drive-shift paddles. 87 Brumby EA81 (Brat) 4MT D/R
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609 Posts
My first experience with Subaru's was over 30 years ago when I went on a road trip with my sister in her 74 1400 DL sedan - liked the way it drove / handled.

Also at the same time my employer had a 81 Brumby (Brat) 1800 D/R which I used briefly - also liked the way it drove on road and off road (on farm where I was working at the time)

The reason why I chose Subaru 25 years ago (6th one now) was that I wanted a car/wagon that was 4WD that still drove well on highways and had offroad ability with manual dual range transmissions to suit my out interests in / around / up mountains where I live and to handle the roads - seasonal yearly conditions here in New Zealand .

Subaru were the first mainstream car manufacturer to produce 4WD cars / wagons 45+ years ago starting in 1972 with 1st wagon produced in Japan.
It didn't appear in the US until 1974.
https://en.wikipedia...ki/Subaru_Leone

They were simple light weight reliable and more economical (compared to conventional heavier 4WD truck / SUVs)

Easy to fix / work on with conventional north / south engine / drivetrain layout.

Handled and drove just as well as similar sized cars because of the lower centre of gravity / positioning of the flatly configured boxer engine despite the higher ride height / ground clearance for off road ability.

Unfortunately this has changed in more recent years as have become higher and heavier more complicated less simple to fix and becoming more SUV like because of fashion, market forces / consumer demand.

This is why I prefer and still have the older ones that are still based on the car / wagon concept ie 2006 Outback wagon and 1987 Brat (mini pickup)

Probably in time I will get used to the look of Gen 4 /5 when I need to replace my Gen 3 in about 5 years time.
 

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2008 OB Limited 2.5i, Portland OR USA
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For the first one I bought (2005 Outback 2.5i NA):
1. Because it fit my outdoor lifestyle so well, where ground clearance and AWD was required for some access points.
2. Because it offered great performance-to-value for an AWD.
3. Because it was a wagon, and these were becoming more rare on the new car market.
4. Because I lived on a hill and occasionally needed AWD even on paved roads.
5. Because it was quite serviceable, and had a strong indy shop close by that offered reasonable service rates compared to the dealers.

For the second one I bought (my present 2008 Outback Limited 2.5i NA):
6. Because the first one saved my life when I was hit from behind at ~50 MPH.
 
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