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2021 Outback Onyx
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$600 to look at brakes and other things that always come back as reported as good? Am I wrong in thinking I should just pay for an oil chang every 6k?
 

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2005 Outback Wagon 3.0 L.L. Bean
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Nice waiting rooms, coffee and doughnuts cost money.
 

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2022 Outback Touring XT. Also 1995 BMW 525i with 240,000 miles
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$600 to look at brakes and other things that always come back as reported as good? Am I wrong in thinking I should just pay for an oil chang every 6k?
Only do things that are required to keep your warranty. Most everything else is additional dealer profit. Attached is the 2022 maintenance schedule. SOA site should have the schedule for other years on their website.
 

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I follow the schedule AND apply the heavy use scenerio as I am in a relatively congested area. I also check the oil, coolant, brake fluid level, and washer fluid weekly and at every fill up. (I also use that opportunity to wipe down the underhood area and cool engine with a damp microfiber cloth to remove road dust and dirt. That goes a long way towards early detection of leaks and low fluid levels.)

I used to do an underbody look-see on my vehicles at every oil change when I did them myself, but now just ever so often. I will check out the brake pad thiickness. I also look closely at where I was parked when I back out since a concrete driveway will show any drips (Which I HATE!!!, so prevention is key.)

Actually, while some of these items are pure dealer profit, if you are not comfortable doing the various inspections and checks, it may be advantageous for you, as many problems cost X dollars to remedy early, but XX dollars to repair a failure. I no longer do all my own maintenance, but I still inspect the car regularly as I hate surprises.
 

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2015 3.6R Limited w/ES
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Feel free to list what's being done for that $600, that's always fun, but it's not at all unusual to find reports of dealerships recommending various things that aren't on the official Subaru schedule (you should have a hard copy in the Warranty & Maintenance booklet, which comes along with your owner's manual).
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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Dude you're literally being ripped off. There's zero reason to go to the dealership unless they're paying for it.

If you can't do it yourself you can have a reputable shop do it. That would be "not the dealership" and as long as you write down some kind of record of service, it's just as good as the dealership doing it and they cannot void your warranty for doing so.
 

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2020 Onyx
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Dealers usually offer a "free" multi-point inspection as a way to look for opportunities to recommend unnecessary services if they are unscrupulous. For them to charge $600.00 for "inspection" if that's all it is, is absolute fleecing.

It's worth learning how to do your own inspections so that you're not bamboozled by liars. At a minimum you can do a cursory check of your brake pads, coolant reservoir, brake fluid, air and cabin filters before going to the dealership.

Also know the difference between what Subaru has on their maintenance schedule, which may be different than the way the dealership represents it as.
 

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You won't need brakes until at least 100k miles unless you do a lot of stop and go traffic, then it may be 80k.

$600 to check door hinges, belts, fluid levels, etc is ridiculous.

Find an indie and keep receipts.
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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You won't need brakes until at least 100k miles unless you do a lot of stop and go traffic, then it may be 80k.

$600 to check door hinges, belts, fluid levels, etc is ridiculous.

Find an indie and keep receipts.
It seems like most of these cars need rear brakes around 60k... Which is unusual because usually it's the front brakes that wear first.

I've never gotten a clear answer for this, but the technicians I was talking to suspect it has something to do with the fact stability management / traction control works by lightly clamping the rear brakes.
 

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I think in the newer Subarus the rear brakes engage first in light braking, which is the majority of braking anyways.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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I was told that with new brake force distribution programming the rear brakes are used more than previously but the pads were not re-sized to compensate...
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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Yes. Don't use the dealer for this either; find someplace else that is competent and offers more reasonable rates, or learn to DIY.
I use the dealer when it was free... But I also brought it in early because you don't want to wait too long to change your oil. Keep in mind they're going to use non-synthetic cheap oil. It will be what meets Subaru's minimum requirements to not fail during the factory warranty. But if you actually care about your vehicle to last beyond the warranty period, you probably want to run better oil. Not to get into a whole oil debate thing but essentially Subarus oil change interval matches most other manufacturers where they stretch it out as long as they possibly can to the detriment of the motor long-term but It won't fail within the warranty period.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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Keep in mind they're going to use non-synthetic cheap oil. It will be what meets Subaru's minimum requirements to not fail during the factory warranty. But if you actually care about your vehicle to last beyond the warranty period, you probably want to run better oil. Not to get into a whole oil debate thing but essentially Subarus oil change interval matches most other manufacturers where they stretch it out as long as they possibly can to the detriment of the motor long-term but It won't fail within the warranty period.
and yet at 100,000 miles my 2011 was going strong on 5,000 mile intervals with dealer oil changes. Why the dealer? They were actually a competitive price and I got a free car wash on top of it.
 

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and yet at 100,000 miles my 2011 was going strong on 5,000 mile intervals with dealer oil changes. Why the dealer? They were actually a competitive price and I got a free car wash on top of it.
That's 5,000 mi intervals for oil changes. That's an appropriate interval.

Your 2011 also doesn't have the maintenance chart modified to look like it requires less maintenance than it should.

It's almost as if I was only talking about Gen 5 vehicles went in the Gen 5 forum.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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Your 2011 also doesn't have the maintenance chart modified to look like it requires less maintenance than it should.
As I recall, the 2011 didn't require synthetic, or even semi-synthetic.

It's almost as if I was only talking about Gen 5 vehicles went in the Gen 5 forum.
You're not in any generation-specific forum section, and your comments didn't seem to indicate any specific model by a generic comment such as
but essentially Subarus oil change interval matches most other manufacturers where they stretch it out as long as they possibly can to the detriment of the motor long-term but It won't fail within the warranty period.
 

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2017 Outback 3.6R
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No non turbo Subaru motors require synthetic, according to Subaru. That doesn't mean it's the best idea. And when you run this exact same oil that you and I change at 5k but they are letting run out to 10K, you gum up your oil control ring. It takes a long while to happen... But the end result is cylinder wall damage from poor oil control, resulting in oil consumption and blow by. And this can get even worse if you just keep adding oil to account for the oil consumption, because the PCV system can't keep up with the amount of blow by going through.
 

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2021 MGM Outback 2.5i Premium with Tungsten Grey seats
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No non turbo Subaru motors require synthetic, according to Subaru.
Since you want to stick to Gen 5, I'll dispute this with a screenshot from the Gen 5 manual -
Font Parallel Circle Number Document

So, yes, there ARE non-turbo Subaru engines that require synthetic, per the manual.
Here's the same page from the Gen 6 manual, no viscosity or oil type difference between engines, synthetic for both.
Font Rectangle Parallel Circle Document

I'll leave the rest be.
 

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Where's it say that? My 2019 non turbo 2.5i Legacy requires synthetic. So did my 2016 before that.
Quite literally I was quoting what the dealer (Crews Subaru in Charleston, I highly don't recommend them) told me. Lol
They also put the non synthetic in my 3.6R for however many free oil changes Subaru gave out.
 
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