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Thanks for that, Brucey. I get in my car, put it in drive and don't worry about the lack of shift points. I think the raccoon on your head and I would agree that for most of us it's non-issue.
 

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Brucey is a Tool of the Devil !
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Show them my video. That's why I made it.

I was hesitant about the CVT when it was new but now that it's been ten years there should be plenty of data available if they're willing to change their mind.
Top Tier gas is just a horseshit marketing gimmick :wink2:
 

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For both those who like the continuous ratio changes and for those who like to feel gears, the current cars have the answer -- You get to choose with your right foot.
I can push the long pedal down and feel the engine rev and shift like the old auto box, or
I can accelerate gently and my shiftless car keeps up with traffic. Actually, that's how I found its continuous mode, following other traffic instead of my usual way of taking off. ;-)
 

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Overall I like the CVT, the only thing that concerns me is the fake shift points.
If you use >30 to 40% accelerator, you introduce the fake shift points, I assume these shift points are always at consistent positions on the CVT pulleys.
If so, is that going to cause premature uneven wear, from the metal chain, at those shift points on the pulleys, which could lead to slippage of the chain in the future?
Personally I would have preferred if Subaru had no fake shift points in Intelligent mode and only included the fake shift points in Sport mode, then drivers would have a choice and possibly everyone would be happy.:smile2:
 

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With the CVT, there's definitely a lag when shifting from P to R or P to D. Lag, as others suggest in this post, runs around 1 to 3 seconds, depending on weather. I make a point of NOT hitting the gas pedal during this time. I suspect people punching the gas during this short interval causes problems with the CVT down the road.


And this lag isn't just a Subaru thing, either. My mom's new Honda HR-V has a CVT and it has a similar lag when shifting.
 

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If you use >30 to 40% accelerator, you introduce the fake shift points, I assume these shift points are always at consistent positions on the CVT pulleys.
I'm not certain about this. I notice that if I pull the paddle shifter or move the shift lever into manual mode for some compression braking downhill, it doesn't lock on the same RPM vs. speed. It seems to depend on the speed I'm traveling when I engage the manual mode. Now if that does the same with the sake shifts on acceleration, I can't say.
 

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When I was first taught how to drive back in 197-something it was on a manual transmission car. My father was a truck driver and would balance a glass of water on the dash while I was driving. Success in shifting gears was determined by that glass of water not sloshing, tipping over or spilling a drop; Failure involved lots of yelling on his part and tears on my part.

I learned how to drive a car with smooth acceleration and smooth shifting and gradual braking. When I was finally allowed to own an automatic transmission vehicle it was unnerving that the car would do all of this jerking around through shift points. The habit has stuck with me and while there are times that I can drive with a lead foot I still buzz through the gears without the kick of gear changes.

Automatic transmission shift points, especially when they are harsh, makes me grit my teeth. Adding shift points to a transmission that does not need them... grrrrrr.
 

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Overall I like the CVT, the only thing that concerns me is the fake shift points.
If you use >30 to 40% accelerator, you introduce the fake shift points, I assume these shift points are always at consistent positions on the CVT pulleys.
If so, is that going to cause premature uneven wear, from the metal chain, at those shift points on the pulleys, which could lead to slippage of the chain in the future?
Personally I would have preferred if Subaru had no fake shift points in Intelligent mode and only included the fake shift points in Sport mode, then drivers would have a choice and possibly everyone would be happy.:smile2:
Interesting post. You're worried about the future wear of the CVT as a result shift points, and I can't go three months without taking my OB in for head unit issues and other oddities. My CVT warranty is somewhere around 100,000 miles.


I think you Sport mode idea is interesting, but isn't using more than 40% of the accelerator kind of driving sporty?

I know, I'm just having a little fun, but I was thinking that if a tree falls in the woods, does the Subaru driver feel the shift points? I mean if Subaru didn't tell anyone about the CVT and we all thought we had a traditional transmission, would there be all this angst?

Beary
 

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I know, I'm just having a little fun, but I was thinking that if a tree falls in the woods, does the Subaru driver feel the shift points? I mean if Subaru didn't tell anyone about the CVT and we all thought we had a traditional transmission, would there be all this angst?
I got used to them, but coming from a Gen 4 that didn’t have the fake shift points, it is a little sad to lose that smooth ramp of RPMs. It’s not nearly as bad as the old 4EAT in the 2.5s of old though.

I’m not too worried about the shift points and longevity. Manual mode quick drops for engine braking are far more aggressive than the fake shift points. And the shift points are much “smoother”, which makes me think they are not as quick as the old 4EAT shifts. But that may be the larger gear ratio changes in the 4EAT messing with me.
 

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When I was first taught how to drive back in 197-something it was on a manual transmission car. My father was a truck driver and would balance a glass of water on the dash while I was driving. Success in shifting gears was determined by that glass of water not sloshing, tipping over or spilling a drop ...
Ah, yes ... the legendary Bob Hoover method.

 

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Ah, yes ... the legendary Bob Hoover method.
I am glad that my daddy didn't know of that one.

He looked upon driving as having the same level of responsibility and competence as if you were handling nuclear weapons. While I had passed drivers education with an A grade I had to wait for an additional two months after turning sixteen years old until there was enough snow and ice so I could pass "his" drivers education training that included oil changes, rotating tires and how to get unstuck from a snowbank. Verbatim compliance with the rules of the road in a way that paid homage to his Marine Corps heritage. Then I was allowed to go down and get my license.

"10 and 2, 10 and 2... always have your hands at 10 and 2, check your gauges and mirrors every 15 seconds, don't let anyone be in your blind spot".
 

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I am on another car forum and people constantly trash the CVT. I tell them I honestly cant say I can tell the difference between a new Subaru CVT and a new regular automatic, and I am guessing most people cant either when driving the car.

ding ding ding ding ding!!!!! Most people (ESPECIALLY the one's that aren't sitting around on auto forums for fun) don't know or care about any of this. I actually tested this when we had a rental 2.5 Outback last year. I let my MIL drive it to town and when she returned I asked her what she thought. Her answer and I quote "it's noisy and you really have to gas it to get up the hill". We were staying in the mountains and she normally drives a Lexus GX so those were relatively fair answers. I asked her if she noticed anything funny about the shifting or transmission and she did not.
 

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Down with fake shift points and the ignorant poopie-heads that thought it would be a good idea! Kinda mitigates the efficiency advantage of a CVT!
 

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That's one of the reasons I went with the 3.6. The CVT rarely feels like a "rubber band", and under most driving conditions the RPMs remain below 2000-2500. Smooth, quiet and powerful. But I pay for that at the fuel pump. :)

atc, it seems to me that the CVT needs a good chunk of torque to operate smoothly as in your 3.6R. From every review I've ever read on Outbacks with the 3.6R, whether the review was done by a professional car mag/website or an owner, they all were pleased with this drivetrain combo - no issues, complaints or concerns.

That's why if I buy an Outback, it will have the six. I'm not concerned that much with the MPG - unless I'm traveling on an interstate for long distances, the Outback 3.6R gets better combined MPG than my '10 Chevy Malibu LTZ w/4 banger.:surprise:
 

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Show me a 4/5EAT getting the mileage the CVTs get.
Said "mitigates" not "negates". The rpm range is kept in a fairly tight band with our CVT which offers up an improvement in fuel economy when coupled with optimized valve opening/duration etc. We should see an improvement in MPG if the rpm range were even tighter. I've got a 2002 Forester and it gets far worse MPG than the new OB.
 

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Interesting post. You're worried about the future wear of the CVT as a result shift points, and I can't go three months without taking my OB in for head unit issues and other oddities. My CVT warranty is somewhere around 100,000 miles.


I think you Sport mode idea is interesting, but isn't using more than 40% of the accelerator kind of driving sporty?

I know, I'm just having a little fun, but I was thinking that if a tree falls in the woods, does the Subaru driver feel the shift points? I mean if Subaru didn't tell anyone about the CVT and we all thought we had a traditional transmission, would there be all this angst?

Beary
I also had 2018 HK head unit lockup issues until I loaded the Rel_U0.18.22.20 update (now U0.18.43.20), that fixed the memory addressing issue, haven't had a problem since.
In Australia prior to Jan 2019 there was only a 3 year warranty (from 2019 5yr warranty), we don't have the extended CVT warranty, our vehicles are made in Japan. If I had a 10 year 100,000mi warranty I wouldn't be concerned either!:wink2:
Actually the 30 to 40% accelerator input introducing the shift points was from a WRX CVT demonstration video.
My 2018 OB starts fake shifting above about 20% (from Car Info>Vehicle Monitor screen) accelerator input (unless you set ACC) but that may be due to always carrying a full cargo load. If you live in a hilly area you will often find yourself going above 20% accelerator and there will likely be additional load on the CVT.
I could afford to replace the HK head unit out of warranty, replacing / rebuilding the CVT out of 3 yr warranty would not be realistic.
My concern is that with normal CVT operation the wear on the V shaped pulleys is fairly evenly distributed, adding fake shift points concentrates the wear at specific points which may possibly lead to the metal chain slipping in the future.
If Subaru restricted the fake shift points to Sport mode only, I could make a choice, and I would be a lot happier.:smile2:
 

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I admit I was very anti-CVT.. My wife had a 97 Civic HX with CVT and a military airstrike would have been too good for that POS.. it was a hamster wheel connected to a rubber band on good days. Was slippery, shuddery, whiney, slow reacting trash most days. Furthering that with experiences with different powersport vehicles and their reliability issues with drivebelts. It was very hard to go into a Subaru and their 1st Gen CVT without bias when I bought my 2012.

It was a completely different driving experience than the Honda.. Kinda slow throttle response but I was able to adjust. When it came to towing a trailer through Appalachians, that "motorboating" that some hate was the most welcoming thing.. Gone were the days of long high grade inclines a matter of a normal auto trans "hunting" for a gear because one was too tall but the other was to high revving. The CVT picked an rpm to maintain speed and held.

When I bought my 2015.. improvements were evident and I was pleased with some of the low speed responsiveness efforts. However, the **** "fake gear" feel is just that, fake feeling.. Add to that, towing the same trailer on the same high grade inclines brought back the same "hunting" of gears. Well done Subaru, you did such a great job at emulating a traditional auto that we get the good with the bad. When 4th is just not quite enough hold but 3rd is way too buzzy..

Jury is still out on reliability.. 92k in and Im more worried about longevity of the wheel bearings, diffs, and cv axles.
 

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Came from a 2.5i 4EAT to a 3.6r CVT and I can't overstate how non disappointed I am. I love it. It's fast, smooth and quiet so long as I'm not gunning it.

I don't really consider myself an automotive enthusiast, never learned to drive stick and I have zero reason to. I don't drive gently, I do the occasional Colin McRae impression on gravel roads and take a 4x4 trail here and there, and it's never been anything but capable and satisfying. Long live the CVT.
 
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