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Discussion Starter #1
For those of you who didn't see my last thread my main crank pulley seperated and started eating into my timing belt cover. I found a pulley from another member on the forum (dryvby thank you very much) bought it for $25.

Started tearing into it last night and couldn't figure out how to lock the crank in place being an auto. Well thanks to some other members I was able to figure that out. But I was still having a **** of a time getting the bolt out.

So good news... I got the pulley off!

Horrible news... I only got it off because I broke the bolt holding it in. I could have sworn I read that it was right hand threaded, so I tightened it until I snapped it right off.

I have no idea what I can do now.

Parts needed:

22mm bolt that holds the pulley on.
Timing belt shroud.
Sanity
Money


Any suggestions on what to do would be greatly appreciated. Or if anyone has those parts I would love to buy them.
 

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it is a right handed thread, righty thighty, lefty loosey.

you are not dead yet, but you have bought your self a bunch of work.

you need
a variable speed drill with reverse.
a left handed drill bit a little smaller than the bolt shank. it will be expensive because of the size and rthe left hand thread, you may have to order it but it will be worth it. cheaper than paying some on to do it.

remove the rad, and maybe the AC condenser. you need room to work.
drill out the bolt in reverse, use lots of oil so it does not over heat and destroy the bit. and drill SLOWLY. you might want to google ''drilling steel bolts'' and read up.
by using the left handed drill bit, at some point the drill bit will have more grip than the threads and the bolt should un-thread on the bit.

once it is out you are good to go.

or take it to a quality shop and pay them to remove it.
if the battery is fully charged you should be able to drive it a few miles to a shop. once the battery dies you will be stranded until you recharge it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I meant left hand thread sorry. I could have sworn it was opposite from normal. And since it was rotating that direction I didn't think anything of it. But my first thought when it let loose was that I broke something, but I wasn't sure what. Now I know.

This is going to require taking out the Radiator, and possibly A/C Condensor correct?

What do I do to prevent drill shavings from falling into the timing belt area? Since the pulley ate through that?
 

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Did it break clean or is there some sticking out, if so you could try a stud remover to remove what remains.

If it broke clean then all is not lost as the tension is gone on the bolt and provided someone hasn't put lock tight on it it may thread out with an easy out or you could try a chisel to tap the bolt loose on the outside of the shank, and once you get some protruding, then grab it with pliers or multi grips.

Drilling it out would be my last resort.
 

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I have had my share of broken bolts. The final fix was drill out the center then using a diamond dusted very small dremel bit at slow speed take the rest down just shy of the threads. Then use a die to run whats left out and clean the threads. I found this to be quickest and done carefully the original threads will be fine and intact. I can tell you breaking off a hardened steel removal tool will make your effort way harder and the dremel grinding bit on very slow speed is your only hope.
 

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what a mess. you must have really been putting some stank on that bolt for it to shear, those are very stout bolts.

i have used right angle drills to get in between the engine and radiator. very solidly place the drill bit in a vice and wail on it with a very stout (like 22 ounce) hammer very fast and you can shear the drill bit in half, making it much shorter.

i've never done a crank bolt though so i'm thinking you will have to remove the radiator and condensor, but you could measure quickly to see if there's any hope.

this is the quickest and easiest way: if the bolt is flush to the snout you could try tack welding a nut to the stud remaining in the crank. place the nut over the stud and just hit some really quick welds on the inside of the nut to weld it to the stud. since the head is gone there won't be any tension on the head so it should remove somewhat easily if you can get something on it.

otherwise you're left drilling.

you can also call around to automotive machine shop - some machine shops will allow you to bring the car to them and they'll do something like this for you. i've done it twice - once for them to make an engine part to replace a bolt that broke off a piece of the engine block and once to repair my friends crank shaft due to this same issue. they have all the equipment to easily do this job and if you find one willing or with the capacity to work on the vehicle it won't take them long or cost much. it would be worth a few calls. my friends car was 1,000 miles away and since i know cars i actually called around for him and found a place to repair it. that car now has 252,000 miles on it and is still running.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well I can get a angle drill in by removing the fans, which I have done.

How can I guarantee I drill straight though? The end of the bolt is all kinds of different shapes, so there is no flat surface to start drilling. I have both left hand drill bits, and easy outs.

None of the bolt is showing it is recessed into the timing gears.

Also I took the timing cover off and there are metal flakes all over in there. Will this be a problem? If so what should I do to fix it?
 

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Never done this before but you could try center pinching and drilling two small holes on opposite hours of the clock e.g. 12:00 and 6:00 in the bolt and use some pointy nose pliers in those holes to try and unscrew it.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I got the remaining parts required today, and started drilling. I was using a set of left hand drill bits. I started with the smallest one and thought for sure I was dead center on the bolt. But of course I wasn't why would it work that well?

After pondering I decided to just keep drilling. I tried to jump up two bit sizes and continue, that didn't seem to be working so I went back down a size. Actually though instead of drilling with that second bit I was backing the bolt out. When I pulled the third bit out the bolt came with it.

Everything else went pretty smoothly. Motor didn't sound too healthy once I started it up, but after running for a few minutes it was fine.
 

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Nice to hear you got this resolved smoothly! Did the metal shavings in the cover come from the bolt shearing? Are you still worried about them?
 

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Actually though instead of drilling with that second bit I was backing the bolt out. When I pulled the third bit out the bolt came with it.
this is why you use ''left handed'' drill bits. regular bits would drill the bolt out, but left handed bits usually remove the bolt before you finish drilling. and then you don't need to drill any more.

glad you got it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I think the metal shavings were from the pulley wearing against one of the timing belt pulleys. After looking deeper into it everything seemed ok, I blew everything off with the air hose, and put it back together. I'll pull the side of the cover off in a week or so and check it again.

And yes the left hand drill bits was a great idea. Can take the easy out set back now.
 
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